Idol Headlines for 03/14/09

‘American Idol’ Spotlight On Christian Singers Reels In Religious Viewers

“Even if contestants don’t come out and say it, we can all spot someone [who is Christian]. The more that there are contestants that we can connect with à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  who we can say, ‘That person is like me’ à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  the more it will probably help drive viewership this year,” Brokaw said, pointing to a moment on Tuesday’s performance show when the judges praised Allen for helping other contestants work on their songs, which Brokaw said brought a knowing nod from Christians who know of his church background.

“We see what kind of person he is, and if you talk to people in his church they’ll say they’re not surprised.” Brokaw said. “But people who don’t know that he’s a worship leader or actively involved in a Christian church might say, ‘Why is he doing that? This is a competition!’ Those are the values people want. We love it as much as anyone when Simon gets snarky, but watching a contestant perform with integrity and treating fellow contestants with grace and dignity speaks to us.”

MTV

‘American Idol’: Why are you afraid of being gay? (When you already are.)

But this year we’ve got Adam Lambert on deck. Could he be the great hope for gays on Idol? He hasn’t specifically addressed his sexuality (and it’s a good guess that Idol producers are telling him not to), but judging by those photos that surfaced last week, it’s certainly a great possibility that this boy could be into boys. (I mean, he’s kissing other boys in some of the photos and dressed in some quite fabulous drag in others.)

The big question is: Why does it all matter so much? Idol is, by nature, a gay-friendly concept: Wannabe pop stars get up and stage rather theatrical performances. Sometimes they even — gasp! — are required to sing show tunes. And dance, too! It’s no shocker that the music industry, because of its creative nature, attracts folks of all stripes — including homosexuals.

Entertainement Weekly

More Idol Headlines after the JUMP…

Feature: They Knew Him When: Broadway Stars Cheer On American Idol Hopeful Adam Lambert

Ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s no longer a secret: we love Adam Lambert, the emo-haired, rock-styled, self-assured Californian with the stratospheric range now making headlines and winning millions of votes as one of the front-runners on hit FOX mega-series American Idol. So why do we dote (besides the obvious talent crush)? The 27-year-old San Diego native is a veteran of the stage, a former community theater kid whoà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s gone on to play roles in the European tour of Hair, the cast of Los Angeles musical The Ten Commandments (opposite film star Val Kilmer), and the touring and Los Angeles casts of Wicked (à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“I was the understudy for Fiyero soà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦ basically, I was in the back,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  he recently joked to Idol producers). So how did the former super trouper step off the stage and into the AI limelight?

Broadway.com

Ousted ‘American Idol’ Hopefuls Talk Future Plans

Jasmine Murray and Jorge Nuà ±ez tell ET what it feels like to be the first contestants from the Top 13 on this season’s “American Idol” to be sent home — and they reveal what their plans are after “Idol.”

“Well, actually, I’m still wondering why is it that I’m so happy,” Nuà ±ez tells ET. “à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦What I thought was, you know, I did my best. I worked really hard, and I did something that not everyone does.”

The 20-year-old contestant from Puerto Rico tells ET he plans to finish college, saying he has just one semester left to be finished with his degree.

ET Online

David Cook Does Finnish Magazine MeNaiset

David Cook has interview in an article of Finnish magazine called MeNaiset. The magazine indicated that he won the American Idol, sold more than a million albums and made friends with his own idol.

Here are the highlights of his interview:

Sponkit.com

Cook serves his audience with charm, good voice

NIAGARA FALLS à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  David Cook leads what can only be called a charmed life, at least in terms of his career in music. He never intended to audition for à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“American Idol,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  reportedly attending tryouts for the televised popularity contest only to offer support for his brother, who didnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t make the cut.

Cook gave it a shotà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’ heck, he was there, so why not? He not only made it, but went on to win the showà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s seventh season. In a matter of months, Cook went from struggling singer/ songwriter/bartender to rock star.

Buffalo News

We Heart Her – Why it’s cool to love Kelly Clarkson.

March 13, 2009 – We used to keep it a secret… our love for Kelly Clarkson. Afraid of endangering our street cred, or being made fun of by our music snob friends, our true feelings for the world’s most likable pop star stayed pent up inside. But we can’t hide it any longer. Kelly Clarkson, if lovin’ you is wrong we don’t wanna be right.

There are more like us out there — we’re sure of it. Living a double life. Secretly Googling “Kelly Clarkson” in the wee hours, while stealthily copying her latest release on to their iPods. Praying they won’t be found out.

Are you one of these closet Clarkson fans? IGN can help. We’re here to assure you that it’s cool to like Kelly Clarkson. Here are some reasons why…

Music.Ign.com

My Conflicted Love for Kelly Clarkson’s New Album

You guys, I’m conflicted about liking Kelly Clarkson’s new album. Check that: For loving her new album. Every track on All I Ever Wanted is at least pop silver, and most are pop gold. In fact, after inspecting them with my jeweler’s loop, I’m here to tell you that “Don’t Let Me Stop You,” “Long Shot,” and “Already Gone” are pop platinum.

Huffington Post

Jason Aldean, LeAnn Rimes Offer Free Shows During ACM Awards

Jason Aldean and LeAnn Rimes will perform free concerts at the Fremont Street Experience in Las Vegas prior to the Academy of Country Music Awards. Aldean will headline the April 3 lineup with Jake Owen, Julianne Hough and Matt Stillwell. On April 4, Rimes will perform along with Kellie Pickler, the Zac Brown Band and Gloriana. As previously announced, Hough, Owen and the Zac Brown Band are competing in the ACM top new artist category after winning top new female vocalist, top new male vocalist and top new vocal group, respectively. Rimes has been named this year’s recipient of The Home Depot Humanitarian Award. The ACM Awards will be held April 5 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

CMT

Justin Stein Supports Malaria No More By Participating As A Panelist & Performer At Change The World

Mar 13, 2009 à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’ Minnetonka, MN – On April 18th, 2009 at 7:30PM, pop singer Justin Stein will be a celebrity judge and performer for the Change the World event sponsored by Brookeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s Bandwagon (a support association for 2008 à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“American Idolà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  finalist Brooke White). The event is set to raise awareness and financial support for the Malaria No More non-profit organization. Stein will be judging talent from all over Minnesota among his fellow celebrity panel of judges including: Paris Bennett (à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“American Idolà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ), Twitch (So You Think You Can Dance), Allison Holker (à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“High School Musical,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“So You Think You Can Danceà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ), Wendi Russo (Mrs. Minnesota America/TV host) and Megan Herickhoff (Miss Teen Minnesota International). Stein will be putting on a special performance among à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“So You Think You Can Danceà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  finalist Twitch and the Minnesota Vikings Cheerleaders.

PR Log.org

Birdsong, DeGarmo, Lowe and Thomas to Star in Back to Bacharach and David

Casting has been announced for Back to Bacharach and David, the musical revue featuring the songs of Burt Bacharach and Hal David that will make its Los Angeles debut April 15 at the Music Box @ Fonda on Hollywood Blvd.

Actress-comic Kathy Najimy will direct the production, which will run through May 17 at the L.A. venue. Opening night is scheduled for April 19.

The cast will comprise Theatre World Award winner Mary Birdsong, “American Idol” finalist and former Hairspray star Diana DeGarmo, West End musical actor and “American Idol” contestant Tom Lowe, and musical and film actress Tressa Thomas.

Playbill.com

Slimmed-down singer Mandisa sings of “Freedom”

NASHVILLE (Billboard) – Longtime fans of former “American Idol” contestant Mandisa will notice a number of positive changes on the singer’s new album, “Freedom.” In addition to a more self-assured sound, the singer is sporting a more fit physique.

“I’ve come into my own,” she says. “This album is more personal. I’ve identified my style and I’m not working with as many producers, which I think brought more focus to this album.”

Reuters.com

Steve-O Talks Back Injury, à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‹Dancing With The Starsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ Appearance

LOS ANGELES à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  While MTV Newsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ visit to the set of à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Dancing With the Starsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  Thursday didnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t feature a lot of dancing, we did get to speak with à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Jackassà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  star Steve-O about his recent back injury, which will probably complicate his appearance on the show next week.

à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Weà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢re working on figuring out the routine à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  and not doing a whole lot of it because my backà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s hurting me a lot,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  Steve-O told MTV News. He said heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s not sure exactly how the injury happened. à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“My back is spasming and a nerveà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s been pinched and ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s a big nightmare. Weà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ve got this really physical routine thatà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s loaded up with stunts and tricks, and weà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢re kinda waiting to practice them, maybe until weà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢re on live TV,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  he said.

MTV.com

New Blog: Lil’ Kim and Derek Hough Aim to Impress on ‘DWTS’

Coming up Monday on ET, “Dancing with the Stars” partners Lil’ Kim and Derek Hough interview each other about first impressions, nicknames, injuries, music and more on the ET stage! Until then, they’re blogging just for ETonline about what they’re doing on “DWTS” Monday night! What surprises are in store? Check out the video!

ET Online

Denver hosts “So You Think You Can Dance” tryouts

DENVER (AP) – They braved the cold to face the producers. Now, a lucky few are getting a chance to impress the judges of “So You Think You Can Dance.”

The hit Fox television program is holding callbacks today at Denver’s Colorado Convention Center for some of the show hopefuls who auditioned yesterday. Another round of first-time auditions and callbacks will take place tomorrow.

Judge Nigel Lythgoe says he’s been a little disappointed, calling some of the would-be contestants good social dancers, but not cut out for a very, very tough professional competition.

KRDO.com

  • Tess

    In fact, Casciotta said, he thinks Christian voters could end up being the deciding factor in this year’s finals. “I would hope for people of faith that they would judge solely by talent,” he said. “But if it came down to it, and the two [finalists] were equally talented and one was Christian, people would vote for that person who shares our faith.”

    –MTV

    To say I am appaled and offended by this article and especially this paragraph is an understatement. If I wasn’t a sane God loving individual I would not vote for any of the listed Contestants (Danny, Michael, Kris, Scott, Matt, and Lil) just out of pure spite. I knew the country was going to be divided on this issue, but for the Christian right to pronounce that they support an us versus them philosophy is absolutely outrageous. Hell, as to the remaining 5 finalists I don’t know, nor do I care if they have any religious affiliation..that’s their private life and not any concern of mine.

    I really am getting sick of dragging out singer’s kids, and churches, and wives and family back stories. Why don’t we find out about their singing history, and what kind of Kid they were, and their personal hobbies. Let’s leave religion out of this, totally!!

  • baxter

    “à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“We see what kind of person he is, and if you talk to people in his church theyà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ll say theyà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢re not surprised.à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  Brokaw said. à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“But people who donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t know that heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s a worship leader or actively involved in a Christian church might say, à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‹Why is he doing that? This is a competition!à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ Those are the values people want. We love it as much as anyone when Simon gets snarky, but watching a contestant perform with integrity and treating fellow contestants with grace and dignity speaks to us.à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ 

    Tess…You took the words right out of my mouth. The above quote from the same article pissed me off as well. Are Christians the only people allowed to help others??? I thought first and foremost, helping another person was just being a good human, I didn’t realize that by helping someone I must be a Christian.

    Just let them sing and i’ll make uo my own mind regardless of any label being attached to anyone.

  • Layla

    Amen Tess! No pun intended. To add to what you said…

    I am sick to DEATH of people who proclaim to be Christian! What the eff does that MEAN? Are they purer and holier than people who are not? Honestly…it makes me sick to my stomach and I find it bordering on cultish. Religion can be a wonderul uplifting part of one’s life but it is PRIVATE and PERSONAL. What the hell is a worship leader anyway??? This is one of the things that turned me off Jason, Brooke and David A. last year…I honestly find it so damn off-putting.

    I’m feeling spiteful now too and it makes me wish that NONE of these so-called Christians make it through to the final 5.

  • http://everyopinion.blogspot.com Terrie

    “Christian” is just another diverse AI viewer demographic that has multiple definitions. Sometimes it is AI emphasizing contestants’ belief systems by showing them in church (Fantasia, Ruben, David Brown, et al). Sometimes it is the contestants themselves, such as Clay wearing a WWJD bracelet on the show or Chris Sligh performing a Mute Math song. Frequently it is the entertainment media, fan sites or fans researching the contestants who publicize their religious backgrounds.

    To me it is no different than AI pimping performers’ families or personal challenges or favoring more attractive contestants. That’s how we found out Kelly was a struggling waitress, Clay was raised by his stepfather, Fantasia was a single mother, Carrie never flew on a plane until AI, Elliott wanted to promote the music of Donny Hathaway, Jordin’s father was professional football player, etc., etc., etc. TIIC will spotlight whatever they think will increase ratings and votes.

  • cheese

    “I think someone like Danny Gokey allows mainstream audiences to see that Christian music is not scary,” she said. “He’s not preachy.

    *cough*

    Danny Gokey, 28, Milwaukee, Wis., on what he’s all about: “I get my strength from my faith in God. My goal is to be a Christian who does mainstream music. I want my music to reach out to the multitudes. I want to bring entertainment, but I want to bring encouragement and hope at the same time.”

    I especially liked Danny’s totally non-scary Christian pelvic thrust taking up half of my TV screen. Such grace and dignity.

  • http://www.myspace.com/gwendolyndiane GwendolynD

    I’m a Christian and a worship leader. I’ve watched Idol since Season 1, and I vote for whoever I want, whenever I want, however I want.

    People like Casciotta have an opinion like everyone else. They don’t define the Christian community.

  • Layla

    I don’t want to hear about anyone’s religious beliefs anymore than I want to hear about their sexual preferences or exploits in the bedroom. It.is.private.and.personal.

  • cay

    I think the christian article is very shallow. For all I know the others are very good people too. Adam has a very popular youtube on him in a Jewish temple singing David Foster’s The Prayer. He is very active in Aids and cancer fundraising in LA. And he says he wants to be a role model for all the kids that “feel different”. Just because Alexis has pink hair doesn’t mean she isn’t the nicest person there. I know many people who go to church faithfully and call themselves Christians, but they are super judgmental.

    I love this season, and I think they all seem like very nice, good people. I don’t see how someone can watch a performance and make assumptions that they are somehow better people than others. That’s what irks me about organized religion in this world.

  • Layla

    …and why do Christians like Danny want to push their beliefs on others??? They are always talking about spreading the word…what word?

  • Lys

    I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t want to hear about anyoneà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s religious beliefs anymore than I want to hear about their sexual preferences or exploits in the bedroom. It.is.private.and.personal.

    *shrugs* I don’t think a person should feel like they need to hide their religious beliefs or keep them “secret” anymore than they should hide their hair color. If it’s truly a part of who they are, and if they want to talk about it, fine. It’s not like they’re shoving a Bible/Koran/Torah down your throat and forcing you to convert…

  • http://myspace.com/girlgeek mj

    I was offended by nearly all the quotes in that MTV article. I may pull the article out for a little editorial.

    I happen to know that Kris is a worship leader, and when I heard he was helping others out I thought “What a nice guy!” Not, “Of, course it’s because he’s Christian!”

    Because Christians run the gamut of human behavior just like anyone else. And folks of other faiths or NO FAITH are absolutely capable of kind acts. There are plenty of so-called Christian asshats running around, that ‘s for sure. One need only look at church scandals that pop up constantly in the news.

    If she wasn’t misquoted, that Joanna Brokaw needs to get out more.

    I’m not religious at all, but I’ve had no problem voting for Christian contestants, and will continue to do that if I like the way they sing.

    And finally, TPTB playing to Christian viewers is nothing new. As a long-time Idol watcher it’s something I noted myself ages ago. Season 6 had 4 cotestants who identified themselves as evangelical–Chris Sligh (who sang two CCM songs in the competition), Phil Stacey, Jordin Sparks and Melinda Doolittle. Plus Lakisha Jones, like Lil Rounds “grew up in the church”.

    Season 7 had two devout mormons, Brooke and David A, plus an evangelical–Jason Casto.

    Season 5 had Mandisa and Chris Daughtry, plus Paris Bennett sang in church.

    Season 4 had Bo, who was very vocal about his faith–his pastor did lots of interviews with the media (too many, but I digress), and Nadia Turner, who sang a CCM song in competition and Scott Savol who sang gospel music.

    Season 3 had returned Mormon missionary, Jon Peter Lewis, Jennifer Hudson, Fantasia (her parents pastored a church) George Huff (who went on to sing Gospel)

    The Season 3 kids, (alongside Prince songs), sang “Eye On The Sparrow” during the S3 tour.

    And then Clay Aiken and his wwjd bracelet Season 2….on and on and on…

    Not a bulletin here. I don’t expect they are courting Christian viewers as much as they are playing (and trying to keep) a base that’s already there…and has been there for a long time.

    As far as the Christian vote putting a contestant over the top. I could say something really obvious, but I’ll just do a Paula and zip my lip.

  • shell29

    People like Casciotta have an opinion like everyone else. They donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t define the Christian community.

    Amen. I don’t remember Jason, Brooke or David A. making a big deal about their respective religions on the show. That said, their faith is a big part of who they are, I don’t see why they have to hide it from viewers if they choose not to. Just stating that you’re Christian, Mormon, Jewish, Muslim etc doesn’t equal “preaching” to me. I guess that’s why the things Danny has said don’t bother me. If the guy feels like using his experience on Idol as a witnessing tool or to bring a message of hope to viewers or whatever, so be it. Viewers are free to accept or reject the message, and so far it seems like a lot of folks in the online Idol fan community are choosing the do the latter.

    I just can’t bring myself to get mad at these contestants for using the exposure they receive through this show for whatever reason, especially since TPTB will make sure they squeeze all they possibly can from them for as long as they’re under their control.

  • m5carolin

    http://www.accesshollywood.com/dish-of-salt-american-idol-spring-tour-2009_video_1059822

    interview with the idols going on the spring break tour: chikezie, gina, phil, melinda

  • Tess

    I grew up in a city where the first words out of a new acquaintance’s mouth was “what religion are you?”. This came from both the members of the predominant religion and from those that weren’t. That way people could decide if they wanted to know you better, or try and convert you, or they then knew how to “act” around you. I HATED it then and I hate it now. It is so shallow and pointless. I don’t give a f–k about anyone’s religion or sexual preference. I try and never JUDGE anyone for their personal beliefs and I admire those who keep their own opinions to themselves. It isn’t that I dislike someone like Danny for being an active participant in his church, but I do dislike that he uses the words like inspirational and uplifting etc. to describe himself and his singing. When contestants talk about song choices I think it is important to keep any signs of “preaching” out of their self-intros.

    I know AI is a popularity contest disguised as a singing competition, but it just seems to me that contestants are getting so voter savvy that they enter the competition knowing just what buttons to push with the viewers. I wish people would just vote for someone who they want to BUY a CD from and will fork out the money to see them in Concert!!

  • hapi

    I agree totally with Gwen D and Terrie!!!!!!

  • weareallinnocent

    I don’t think anyone should have to hide anything at all. I am troubled, however, that certain aspects of one’s private thoughts and lives will bring automatic “way to go” and “he/she’s one of us” while other personal aspects will bring automatic scorn, judgment, public shunning, and withdrawal of support no matter how talented. Likewise, I am deeply offended, as others have mentioned, by the notion that because someone does something kind, he’s Christian, as though only (or all) Christians are kind and no one else is. And, of course, I’m most troubled by the blind allegiance to anyone who declares him- or herself Christian, to the exclusion of anyone who doesn’t.

    Yes, the “us v. them” mentality is about as far from “Christian” as you can get, in my view and based on my own reading of scripture. It’s a very prevalent part of many organized religious efforts, along with the air of superiority, that I never will understand much less reconcile with religious teachings.

  • Lu

    Yeah, that article is right on! I’m pretty involved in my church and sing in the choir. Each idol season I scan the contestants to see who the best Christian is so I can say “hey – there’s someone like me!”. Yep, that’s what I do. I guess that’s why the biggest connection I ever had to an idol contestant was Elliott Yamin.

  • kathrynTX

    Hi cheese! THIS:

    I especially liked Dannyà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s totally non-scary Christian pelvic thrust taking up half of my TV screen. Such grace and dignity.

    I am finding Gokey and his Pokey Hokey more and more creepy and off-putting and just downright annoying. When it is acceptable to talk about being NON-religious or being gay or being straight or being white or being black or being brown or WHATever, then we can all be tolerant and accepting of people who are not like us and talk all we want. Nicely.

    I find the constant BS about how “Christian” people are annoying too. What really gets to me is how it seems totally acceptable to go on about how religious you are and preach to others…BUT it is totally unacceptable to just say flat out “NO, I DON’T believe in your God or your religion or your faith or whatever the heck total crap you believe because you WANT to. And you can’t talk me into it either, I’ve made up my mind, just like you have.” People look at you like you have 3 heads if you say NO I’m NOT a Chrisitan in this allegedly Christian country. And I feel like (yes, this is so personal) I am immediately looked down upon, probably as a heathen, by these Christians. And they look down upon others who DO believe in some other religion – but not THEIRS.

    There was some unbelievable BS that went on at my work during the election this year. I could not believe that some people were allowed to state LOUDLY that Obama is the f-ing (my word!) ANTICHRIST, a Muslim (in a bad way, ya know), a terrorist…I kept waiting for the n-word. JEEBUS. And folks, these Christians were totally serious. OK, you delusional paranoid freaks. Just STFU and VOTE then. I will too.

    If “these people” do not represent Christians, then who does? Seems to me they do. This is what the world sees, like it or not. If I know any quiet, non-preaching, non-judgemental Christians, I guess I’m unaware of them because…well, they keep it to themselves and don’t try to shove it down my throat like others I’ve known. If you’re out in public blabbing about your Christianity, you ARE REPRESENTING.

    As my brother, who has been persecuted to no end by loving, tolerant, accepting Christians, says, “It’s YOUR religion, it’s YOUR God, YOU burn in hell.”

  • http://myspace.com/girlgeek mj

    Yeah, that article is right on! Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m pretty involved in my church and sing in the choir. Each idol season I scan the contestants to see who the best Christian is so I can say à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“hey – thereà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s someone like me!à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ . Yep, thatà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s what I do. I guess thatà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s why the biggest connection I ever had to an idol contestant was Elliott Yamin.

    LOL Lu. I love you!

    Of course, that article is painting one side of the story, and I have no doubt the two people Gil interviewed don’t represent the views of all Christians, even evangelicals. It might have served him well to seek out some alternate views

    What bothers me though, is that Brokaw chick has been getting a lot of attention for her Idol blogging. I totally know who she is, because right now she’s Miss Christian Idol Blogger of the Idol internet world. This isn’t the first interview she’s done, and it likely won’t be her last. So, for better or for worse, she’s representing Christian Idol fans in the media.

  • brextra

    People like Casciotta have an opinion like everyone else. They donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t define the Christian community.

    I totally agree with that statement. I’m a Christian of the evangelical sort. I admit that I may end up having increased positive feelings towards someone if I can identify with their similar beliefs. It’s natural to have positive feelings towards someone you can identify with.

    But they’ve got to be able to SING, and they’ve got to be something that I would listen to musically. I have to have a reason for liking them before I find out that they are Christians. I like Gokey so far based on his talent, and I like Kris Allen based on the promise I see. But I do not like Michael Sarver. Not my thing. I would never ever like someone just because they are a Christian.

    My favorite this year is Adam, and I fully expect that it will remain so. I don’t care about his beliefs or his sexual preference. I care that he seems like a nice guy and he can SING! And yeah, I’ll admit. I’m a little shallow. He’s pretty darn good looking too. :smile1_ee:

    That said, their faith is a big part of who they are, I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t see why they have to hide it from viewers if they choose not to.

    I agree with this as well. It’s just part of who they are. I wouldn’t mind it if Anoop shared about his religious background, which he did a little bit last week in his video package. And I wouldn’t mind if Adam were able to talk about being gay, because it’s part of who he is. I don’t care what the contestants talk about, because it’s part of who they are.

  • weareallinnocent

    Chris Daughtry, who has gained a strong following thanks to his spiritually inclined lyrics

    Seriously? Did I totally miss the boat on Chris? He’s embraced for spiritually inclined lyrics? Like, say, on rock radio for example?

    I’m partly being facetious, but I am totally dubious. As someone who owns (and in the past frequently listened to) his debut album — but admittedly did not watch his stint on AI — I absolutely missed the spirituality in his songs. Is it there, or is this just an attempt to exploit his popularity?

  • Lu

    What bothers me though, is that Brokaw chick has been getting a lot of attention for her Idol blogging. I totally know who she is, because right now sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s Miss Christian Idol Blogger of the Idol internet world. This isnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t the first interview sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s done, and it likely wonà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t be her last. So, for better or for worse, sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s representing Christian Idol fans in the media.

    This is troubling. Sounds like we need a Christian to put a different spin on things. Each week after choir practice we go to a choir members house and have wine (shock!) and we always talk about idol. Right now the favorite of my choir is Adam. So maybe my choir needs to blog – lol! Will you teach us MJ???

  • brextra

    What bothers me though, is that Brokaw chick has been getting a lot of attention for her Idol blogging. I totally know who she is, because right now sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s Miss Christian Idol Blogger of the Idol internet world. This isnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t the first interview sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s done, and it likely wonà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t be her last. So, for better or for worse, sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s representing Christian Idol fans in the media.

    This bothers me as well. Christians are people, which means that they are diverse in opinions and the way they handle themselves. I hate that certain people have become focal points and representations of who Christians are as a whole.

  • Tess

    OK…stupid thought, but—

    What if on your American Idol interview (that is released to the public) YOU HAD to disclose the following under penalty of being eliminated:

    What is your religion?
    What is your sexual preference?
    Which polital party do you support?
    Have you ever had ANY contact with law enforcement and to what extent?
    Do you believe in gay rights, abortion, Peta, the Sierra Club (the list could be endless)?
    Which charities or fund raising endeavors do you support?
    How old were you when you lost your virginity?
    Have you ever done drugs, spent time in rehab, do you drink or smoke?

    These are the kind of things that get plastered all over the internet, anyway, so they should all be brought out before the public ever votes for a contestant. You know, to be an informed voter we need to know all of the above.

  • hermy

    ugh, eww. That mtv article is disgusting

  • http://myspace.com/girlgeek mj

    Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m partly being facetious, but I am totally dubious. As someone who owns (and in the past frequently listened to) his debut album à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  but admittedly did not watch his stint on AI à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  I absolutely missed the spirituality in his songs. Is it there, or is this just an attempt to exploit his popularity?

    His song “Home” appeared on the Billboard Christian charts. Not sure why exactly.

    So did Carrie Underwood’s “Jesus Take the Wheel”

  • May

    Gwen and Terrie, I completely agree. Lu…great reality check.

    I agree with those who say that religion is personal. However, every time American Idol gives a contestant’s backstory, they expose part of their personal life. To me, the fact that you are divorced or a widower or strip-danced for a living or lived in a car (Josiah) is equally as personal as your religion, so where do we draw the line? I’m not religious at all, but I think that if the church makes up a big part of someone’s life, I don’t necessarily think they should have to hide it just to avoid offending some people. In fact, a lot of contestants mention the church because it was where they learned to sing…seems appropriate in the Idol context. I can’t speak for this year, but I didn’t get the impression that Brooke, Jason or Archie were trying to use their religion as evidence of their “goodness”. It’s sad to think that people were turned off by them just because they mentioned their religion. That seems just as bad as the people voting for them just because of their Christian background.

    On a lighter note, someone posted a clip of David Cook addressing the hat “controversy”..well sort of!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTzkRsLNxWM

  • Ashley19

    I think someone like Danny Gokey allows mainstream audiences to see that Christian music is not scary,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  she said. à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s not preachy.

    Not at all! :rolleyes_wp:

  • weareallinnocent

    OMG May, thank YOU for THIS!! LMAO

    On a lighter note, someone posted a clip of David Cook addressing the hat à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“controversyà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ..well sort of!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTzkRsLNxWM

  • cay

    I don’t think the blogger will really impact people. I mean Archie blogged this week about how much he loved Adam’s Black and White. I doubt Archie cares what religion he is. I love Anoop. He could be anything, or nothing, and it wouldn’t change that I think he’s adorable and I would love to hang out with him.

    I really liked reading the other articles posted too. Cook is always cute (OMG so cute on the tv yesterday) and I loved hearing what Adam’s broadway friends posted about him. Great information from them and they are true professionals. I too think we haven’t heard the best of what he can do.

  • CFIdolsfan

    Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m a Christian and a worship leader. Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ve watched Idol since Season 1, and I vote for whoever I want, whenever I want, however I want.

    People like Casciotta have an opinion like everyone else. They donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t define the Christian community.

    No, they don’t. I, too, will vote for whom I choose. Neither Casciotta nor Brokaw speak for me, but I am not ashamed to say that I am Christian and am delighted to see Christians on the show. Btw, mj, you forgot to mention the Christians on season 6: Phil Stacey, Melinda Doolittle, Jordin Sparks, Chris Sligh, and Lakisha Jones. Phil and Melinda are my 2 favorites of the season.

    Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m not religious at all, but I think that if the church makes up a big part of someoneà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s life, I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t necessarily think they should have to hide it just to avoid offending some people. In fact, a lot of contestants mention the church because it was where they learned to singà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦seems appropriate in the Idol context. I canà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t speak for this year, but I didnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t get the impression that Brooke, Jason or Archie were trying to use their religion as evidence of their à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“goodnessà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ . Ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s sad to think that people were turned off by them just because they mentioned their religion. That seems just as bad as the people voting for them just because of their Christian background.

    No, we shouldn’t hide it. Christ told us to talk about Him and our faith, because it is something that can change you so greatly. Also, calling Christianity a “religion” is really misleading, because it is a way of life based a relationship with an Almighty God. A religion can often become bunch of do’s and don’ts without any life and enjoyment, and Christianity has unfortunately been turned into such by many. Some very well-known people in the music and film industries are Christian, and they credit their faith for having changed their lives. One such person who did so recently was Sheila E. on the show “Gone Country.” If people are offended, it is because unfortunately, they have had a bad experience with church and religion. Actually, so have I as a Christian. I have been hurt and backstabbed by others who said they were Christian. But because I know we all as humans are imperfect, I put my faith and trust my God and not in man. All I can say is “sorry” and to not think of all of us as bad.:-) And as far as AI again, I support whom I choose. It just so happens that most of those who have touched me were fellow Christians.:-)

  • lizland

    I have no problem with people being active in their church or even talking about it if it is a significant part of their life. Or even folks voting for them because of it (it’s as good a reason as cuteness or ability to caw. ) I’m not naive enough to expect everyone to vote based on actual vocal ability and after all that is highly open to individual taste anyway.

    But the sly underbelly of the whole article is the unstated implication that if you are not one of the “Christians” as they define it, you aren’t “good”. It’s so judgmental an attitude. Very unchristian, in fact.

  • Dr. Tracey

    Wow I had no idea Chris Daughtry’s lyrics were spiritually inclined. I followed him on Idol and i’ve been listening to his CD for months and months, i’ve even seen him in concert twice and I had no clue he was religious.
    That’s fine with me though, i’d rather not know a performers religion, political beliefs or sexual preferences. I just want to be entertained, music is my escape.
    I would never vote for someone because they vote/swing/pray the same way I do but I might NOT vote for them because they have decided to send me a message. If that makes me a hypocrite then so be it.

  • CFIdolsfan

    His song à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Homeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  appeared on the Billboard Christian charts. Not sure why exactly.

    So did Carrie Underwoodà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Jesus Take the Wheelà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ 

    I believe it is because Christian charts will promote music that is positive, whether it mentions Christ or not. I saw Phil’svideo for “If You Didn’t Love Me” featured on a show on the Gospel Music Channel that allows programs for different musical genres that talk about God or anything positive. Phil’s video and the song don’t mention God, but it does mention the love and support of your loved ones, and love is something talked about a lot in Christianity. I haven’t listened carefully to “Home,” but I assume it is positive in its content. And “Jesus Take the Wheel” basically says that the person wants Christ to take charge of their lives, instead of them running it, because they don’t feel they do a good job by themselves.

  • http://www.myspace.com/gwendolyndiane GwendolynD

    The article sucks, I must admit. Apparently, someone felt the need to play God.

    What irks me that most is that someone is making it appear as though Christians have suddenly appeared on Idol, when they’ve actually been there all along.

    It’s apparently the result of a very ill-perceived us vs. them year, re the election. That’s skewed anyway because here’s a Christian who voted for Obama. So…it’s simply all about perception.

    Danny Gokey has never said, “I’m a Christian, so Christians will vote for me.” I believe there will be some non-Christians in his corner simply because he’s talented.

  • ptslittlecomment

    What bothers me though, is that Brokaw chick has been getting a lot of attention for her Idol blogging. I totally know who she is, because right now sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s Miss Christian Idol Blogger of the Idol internet world. This isnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t the first interview sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s done, and it likely wonà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t be her last. So, for better or for worse, sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s representing Christian Idol fans in the media.

    I have to say, this information above is the part of this that upsets me the most.

    I am a Christian ( and by that I mean a follower of Christ), but I am really upset by the “Call to Arms” tone this lady has adopted. To create an “Us Against Them” mentality does no one any good, and seems to be hurting the very people the Brokaw woman is rallying support for.

    If I could speak to her for a moment I would say many things (lol). But I would be sure to point out that AI voters had a choice between an obvious Christian and, someone who was at least thought to be, an agnostic, in the finals last year. Who did they pick?

    Christians are people – we are not GOD, even though some of us seem to think so – and we have widely diverse interests and needs. GOD bless Kris for helping the others out. But let that be his witness, not some rallying cry for a woman so in need of attention for herself – not her cause.

  • http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/profile.php?id=587900002&ref=name cruzceleste

    I canà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t speak for this year, but I didnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t get the impression that Brooke, Jason or Archie were trying to use their religion as evidence of their à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“goodnessà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ .

    I don ´t remember any of the about ever making a mention about their religions…but maybe I wasto focus on their singing to “note” the important thing that should mademe like them or not… :/ promese to pay more atention in the future…

  • LaurelG

    But the sly underbelly of the whole article is the unstated implication that if you are not one of the à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Christiansà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  as they define it, you arenà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“goodà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ . Ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s so judgmental an attitude. Very unchristian, in fact.

    Exactly how I feel. “Judgmental” and “unchristian” are the key words here. What’s amazing to me is that people like Miss Christian Idol Blogger are so lacking in self-awareness that they fail to appreciate the underlying meaning of their own words.

  • flynnsgirl

    What scares me about this is there could be a rallying of the troops. so to speak. Power vote for one of the Christian kids, just to get Adam off because of his sexuality. The internet has been filled with comments like “We should Matthew Shepard him” Which make me sick to my stomach. The people holding those hateful signs at Matthew’s funeral and at the Academy Awards this year are all Church going Christians. Please know I am not lumping every Christian into this category. It’s just that these groups can be very loud.

  • Ashley19

    ^^ What?? OMG, this is awful!!

  • Natasha

    The MTV article is pretty off-putting. It makes it seem like Christians see everything in an “us” vs. “them” alignment and that’s always an uneasy feeling.

    “Even if contestants don’t come out and say it, we can all spot someone [who is Christian].” Really? Is there some sort of secret hand signal?

    The entire article made me very uncomfortable.

  • Layla

    If people are offended, it is because unfortunately, they have had a bad experience with church and religion.

    I disagree as this is not the case for me, my husband and many others that I know.

    The problem for me (us) is this clannish, cultish, little respect for other belief systems and judgemntal attitude of everyone I have met who professes to a Christian. Why do they have to shout it from the rooftops and seek to influence people and talk about wanting to be inspirations? Why do Christians seek to convert and spread the gospel!??? I honestly wish they would STFU!

    I lived and worked in Africa for 5 years and these Christian missionaries were the bane of the existence for those of us who were there to help and support the local people. These overzealous Christians used their time trying to convert them. And don’t even get me started on the fight for political power various Christian authorities took part in!

  • AnoopFan

    A friend of Anoop’s said that he is singing a song “that may or may not have been sung before on the show.” He also hinted at “Always On My Mind”

    Don’t know what to think about that.

  • brextra

    What scares me about this is there could be a rallying of the troops. so to speak. Power vote for one of the Christian kids, just to get Adam off because of his sexuality. The internet has been filled with comments like à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“We should Matthew Shepard himà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  Which make me sick to my stomach.

    Wow. I am appalled. I am so glad that I have not seen any of this “we should Matthew Shepard him” stuff. I seriously do not want to have to start worrying about Adam’s safety. He shouldn’t have to worry about that. He should just be having the time of his life. This is infuriating. I truly hope that it’s just some idiots on the internet and no one is actually planning on doing anything like that. But I suppose it’s a risk for any gay person who comes across the wrong person at the wrong time.

    I also truly hope that this doesn’t become an “us vs. them” type thing for the voting. I do not want to see articles like that around the internet.

    Oh my goodness, this makes me angry. I can’t even think straight.

    The people holding those hateful signs at Matthewà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s funeral and at the Academy Awards this year are all Church going Christians. Please know I am not lumping every Christian into this category. Ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s just that these groups can be very loud.

    Were those the Westboro Baptist Church people? Those people are complete psychos. I don’t know anyone who would consider them to be Christians. And the stuff they picket doesn’t even make sense.

  • Natasha

    Power vote for one of the Christian kids, just to get Adam off because of his sexuality. The internet has been filled with comments like à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“We should Matthew Shepard himà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  Which make me sick to my stomach.

    Is this actually going on? If so it’s truly depressing.

  • flynnsgirl

    Were those the Westboro Baptist Church people? Those people are complete psychos. I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t know anyone who would consider them to be Christians. And the stuff they picket doesnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t even make sense.

    Yes, I believe they were, but my point is they are from a “Christian Church”, psycho or not. so…
    There have been horrible comments on the internet about Adam and this kind of article just helps to flame the fires IMO.
    I wouldn’t be surprised if at some point there were picketers outside of the AI theater.

  • cookcricket

    This bothers me as well. Christians are people, which means that they are diverse in opinions and the way they handle themselves. I hate that certain people have become focal points and representations of who Christians are as a whole.

    Me too!!!!

  • Victoria

    ^ Me three.

    The MTV article is pretty off-putting. It makes it seem like Christians see everything in an à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“usà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  vs. à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“themà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  alignment and thatà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s always an uneasy feeling.

    à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Even if contestants donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t come out and say it, we can all spot someone [who is Christian].à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  Really? Is there some sort of secret hand signal?

    The entire article made me very uncomfortable.

    I agree with you 100%. I found that article completely ridiculous, especially the line “I think that Christians probably watch the show all the time but maybe don’t admit it.” What the heck? Do they think we sit around and watch TV preachers? I go to a Christian school and almost every student watches Idol.

    Besides, many contestants from years past have started out singing in their church, so I don’t see the purpose in even writing the article.

    The whole thing was just one of the most ignorant articles I’ve read in a long time. I can’t even begin to point out all the things that are wrong with it (and I won’t try because 1, it would take too long and 2, MTV’s website makes my computer slow).

    This is troubling. Sounds like we need a Christian to put a different spin on things. Each week after choir practice we go to a choir members house and have wine (shock!) and we always talk about idol. Right now the favorite of my choir is Adam. So maybe my choir needs to blog – lol! Will you teach us MJ???

    If your choir did that, I can promise you one reader! :happy_tb:

    ETA:

    What scares me about this is there could be a rallying of the troops. so to speak. Power vote for one of the Christian kids, just to get Adam off because of his sexuality. The internet has been filled with comments like à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“We should Matthew Shepard himà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  Which make me sick to my stomach.

    Are you serious? That’s absolutely awful! I had to go google Matthew Shepard, and… wow. That’s terrible. I agree, it makes me sick as well.

    Were those the Westboro Baptist Church people? Those people are complete psychos. I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t know anyone who would consider them to be Christians. And the stuff they picket doesnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t even make sense.

    I definately wouldn’t consider them Christians. Everything they are doing goes against Christianity. Hopfully, this comment was an isolated case, because all the comment’s I’ve seen about Adam have been “I don’t care if he’s gay, this is a SINGING competition!”

    BTW, sorry, this is a really long post.

  • http://myspace.com/girlgeek mj

    Btw, mj, you forgot to mention the Christians on season 6: Phil Stacey, Melinda Doolittle, Jordin Sparks, Chris Sligh, and Lakisha Jones. Phil and Melinda are my 2 favorites of the season.

    No, I did not leave them out. Re-read my post.

    The people holding those hateful signs at Matthewà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s funeral and at the Academy Awards this year are all Church going Christians.

    No, those people are a family of nut-bars who call themselves Christian. They travel all over the country picketing events. They are a very poor example to cite.

    But the sly underbelly of the whole article is the unstated implication that if you are not one of the à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Christiansà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  as they define it, you arenà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“goodà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ . Ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s so judgmental an attitude. Very unchristian, in fact.

    Yes. Brokaw isn’t explicit, but it’s pretty clear she’s talking about evangelical Christians who believe as she does. Those “others” who call themselves Christian–Catholics, mainstream protestants (she probably wouldn’t approve of the lesbian who ministers at the Episcopalian church on my street–and by extension, the entire congregation) or Mormons (evangelicals have been known to picket Mormon temples)–are not who she’s identifying with.

  • cookcricket

    This whole Matthew Shepard/Westboro Baptist Church thing makes my stomach turn. I don’t even want to google it because it burns me up that people do this kind of thing, and that they cause people to think that this is what Christianity is about.

  • May

    The problem for me (us) is this clannish, cultish, little respect for other belief systems and judgemntal attitude of everyone I have met who professes to a Christian.

    Layla, I’m confused about your interpretation of the word Christian. Are you using it to describe anyone baptized Christian or are you using it to describe those who make proselytizing part of their living? I know lots of people who are only marginally religious, but still say they are Christian (because that’s their heritage). Yes, some Christians are very vocal and judgmental (I definitely know where you are coming from with your comment about missionaries in Africa) but a lot of Christians are not. If you ask me, condemning someone for just saying that they are Christian sounds just as judgmental as those who condmemn people for not being Christian. Just another double standard.

  • ptslittlecomment

    Why do they have to shout it from the rooftops and seek to influence people and talk about wanting to be inspirations? Why do Christians seek to convert and spread the gospel!??? I honestly wish they would STFU!

    There is a reason we are compelled to do so, but now is not the time nor place to go into it. By way of short explanation, let’s just say we have Scriptures and a Faith to compel us to do so and they also tell us that we will held accountable if we don’t. But its kind of like getting someone to try a really great food you crave for the first time. You really want to share something you love. It saddens me to no end when people go beyond preparing and offering the dish to trying to cram it down someone’s throat.

  • soundscene

    The problem for me (us) is this clannish, cultish, little respect for other belief systems and judgemntal attitude of everyone I have met who professes to a Christian. Why do they have to shout it from the rooftops and seek to influence people and talk about wanting to be inspirations? Why do Christians seek to convert and spread the gospel!??? I honestly wish they would STFU!

    Oh my. Well, there’s a difference between overbearing evangelical Christians who force their beliefs on others even after it is clear they don’t want such “guidance,” and the rest of the population of this and other countries who call themselves Christian. As in, those who believe in Christ as the Son of God, which is the only qualification you need to call yourself Christian. It comprises so many different religions–Catholic, Episcopalian, Baptist, Mormon, Methodist, etc. And within these religions there are both liberal and conservative groups. To use the word “Christian” to solely describe the most overbearing of hundreds of millions of people is factually incorrect. It is, rather, just another sad stereotype.

    I was raised Catholic by a Catholic mother and a Jewish father. I went to an Episcopalian grade school and high school, a Baptist college, and an extremely liberal state law school in San Francisco. I’ve met evangelists and atheists. I’ve met those who cover their entire body to go outside, and those who choose wear only a thong on the streets of San Francisco. And there are asshat evangelists in the same relative number as asshat atheists. Just as there are wonderful people who could be considered evangelists, and wonderful people who call themselves atheists.

  • Tess

    ptslittlecomment,

    My philosophy is you don’t talk religion, politics, or sexual preference without strict permission to do so. I’m a pretty smart person and I don’t need anyone to proselite me to their way of thinking. If I were interested I would research it myself.

    letà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s just say we have Scriptures and a Faith to compel us to do so and they also tell us that we will held accountable if we donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t.

    This kind of statement is what is so wrong with “religion”. Using “scare” tactics on a member to ensure that the message is being delivered to all of us who don’t want to hear it or participate in it. That is my complaint about the article we are discussing. I don’t care what “religious” affliation any Idol is I just don’t want ANYONE telling anyone else that they should Vote for them because they are Christian and insinuating that they are “better” because they embrace Christianity.

  • Natasha

    Everyone has the right to practice the religion of their choice in this country,no question about that. I would just hate to see Idol become too much about that. Granted there are always these little subplots circulating on Idol but I hope they stay at the level and don’t start to dominate.

    The people quoted in the MTV article seem to be pushing the religious issue more than the contestants. I may have missed something but the only contestant I’ve seen push religion to the point of being preachy and making me uncomfortable is Danny Gokey.

  • flynnsgirl

    The people holding those hateful signs at Matthewà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s funeral and at the Academy Awards this year are all Church going Christians.

    No, those people are a family of nut-bars who call themselves Christian. They travel all over the country picketing events. They are a very poor example to cite.

    It doesn’t matter to me that this is one group of people who are crazy, they are still calling themselves Christians and they have the ability to rile up others. The Aryan Nation is also comprised of church going Christians. They put it out there and then the media picks up on it and we see them on TV, which in turn spreads the hate more and more.
    My friend is a very involved church going Christian women and she told me one day that her church does not accept homosexuals, that they wouldn’t “hurt” them but that they don’t want them in their church. This is an upper class educated women. She told me this 3 years ago and I still haven’t gotten over it.
    This article has the ability to stir it up and bring the crazies out of the woodwork.

  • ptslittlecomment

    Tess, I was not saying that I was any better than anyone for following Christ. Far from it. I was merely trying to answer the question as to why some folks are compelled to “Shout it from the rooftops”. Having the faith that compels you into action isn’t a scare tactic if you are truly following the being that inspired the faith. However, when it morphs into more than that – as I said in my first post on this subject – it becomes something more of this world than of faith. I am a pretty intelligent person as well, and I know that the best way to spread the Gospel is by doing what you said, living the life to a degree that it compels others to want to investigate it. As St. Francis said “Share the Gospel wherever you go, and when necessary, use words.” I cannot deny that I will not mention my faith because it is just as much a part of me as being an actress or working with Special Olympics. But I am not going to shove it down your throat. And I will respect your opinions on the matter. I don’t agree with the article, so we should have no beef here :smile1_tb:

  • justshootme

    OK. Marginally religious (on a good day) Christian checking in here. Big difference between wacko self-proclaimed Christian nut jobs and average everyday Christian (insert big umbrella here) folks. Just one more stereotype.

    And personally I think anybody who admits to voting for a contestant on a freaking game show because they check the same box as far as religion goes is an idiot.

  • Lys

    My philosophy is you donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t talk religion, politics, or sexual preference without strict permission to do so.

    Okay. I get that. But that statement in and of itself is a personal belief. And you’re well within your rights to share it, just as others are within their rights to share their personal beliefs.

  • oceana

    It’s offensive and misguided to think that only Christians are nice, kind, generous people, or that all Christians are that way. I’m glad to find that many were as offended by that article as I was the moment I read it.

    When it comes to voting, religion is one factor among many that could influence how I voted (if I still voted). I would vote for contestants like Brooke and Jason who don’t parade their beliefs for the camera. I know they are religious but that’s their own business and I’m not aware of what their beliefs are and I don’t really care to know. It’s not my business. It’s their personal choice what to believe.

    But someone like Mandisa turned me off by making easily-decoded religious comments and then I read things about her that seemed anti-gay and so yes I was turned off to her, as someone I wouldn’t agree with on most issues.

    It sucks when people play the “religion” card in order to get votes. If this show becomes a show watched mostly by Christian fundamentalists and if a majority of the contestants are the same and make no bones about it, they’re going to lose a lot of viewers that’s all I can say. If it’s a secular show, then leave religion out of it, or at least keep it to a minimum.

    Religion is not equivalent to someone’s hair color. Hair color is basically non-controversal, whereas religion has a whole history of wars fought, countries divided against each other and against themselves, infidels killed and the list goes on. Religion is a heated subject and that’s another reason I don’t think it belongs on the show. What’s next, politics? Will the contestants start declaring if they are democrats or republicans, and we can vote based on that?

    Somewhere the singing gets lost in the shuffle. Of course the contestants are different people going to appeal to different segments of the audience, but to topload the show with an overabundance of one type of person, i.e. Christian worship leaders, is lopsided and will displease as many as it pleases. Perhaps many Christians like it and see nothing wrong with it, but others are very much offput by it.

    Really, I say, put politics in place of religion, and it’s easy to realize how divisive and controversal the show could become. Same difference.

  • oceana

    I am a pretty intelligent person as well, and I know that the best way to spread the Gospel is by doing what you said, living the life to a degree that it compels others to want to investigate it.

    No matter how subtle Christians try to be about it, the bottom line is that many of them have this core belief that they must “spread the Gospel” and they don’t even realize why that is annoying to other people. It’s presumptious to think that one must spread their way to others, implying that their way is the best, they have the one true faith, and it’s their duty to spread it to the world.

    That’s why many people avoid Christians, because there is usually an underlying assumption that they are going to try to convert everyone they meet, and if they don’t try, at least they are thinking that they wish they could, and that everyone else is going to hell except them. It gets in the way and comes between people, this belief that one must “spread the Gospel” to others who don’t want it, don’t need it, have heard it all before and have made a conscious choice that they don’t want it, but their choice isn’t respected.

  • bean99

    Wow I had no idea Chris Daughtryà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s lyrics were spiritually inclined. I followed him on Idol and ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ve been listening to his CD for months and months, ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ve even seen him in concert twice and I had no clue he was religious.

    I don’t know if I buy the lyrics comment but I did know that Chris is religious. Apparently he’s written songs with the Christian band “Day of Fire” and have heard that his old band “Absent Element” was a Christian rock band.

    My mom was a born again Christian and I’m a little sensitive to anyone pushing their beliefs on me but don’t feel the idols are doing that. I consider myself a Christian but not an Evangelical and vote for who I like.

  • http://emmarude65embarqmail.com carroll

    To get rid of some of the crazy churches, I say let the goverment tax their money. This would help the national debt and stop some of the craziness. JMHO

  • yummystars

    I’m a bit off-topic as far as the comments go, wanted to say something about the gay issue brought up in The Advocate and EW articles. I think a big reason why Adam Lambert is sailing thru is because of his glam rock black eyeliner kick-ass vibe. If he were a country artist, for example, it’d be way way more of an issue. But his sound and look and genre all fit together and it makes sense. And it helps that he’s no pushover and looks like he doesn’t care what you think. David Bowie, Freddie Mercury, Elton John, it worked for them too. In certain genres, people don’t give a &*&$, in fact, a little Velvet Goldmine is a plus.

  • KathyH

    “Were those the Westboro Baptist Church people? Those people are complete psychos. I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t know anyone who would consider them to be Christians. And the stuff they picket doesnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t even make sense.”

    Yep. I live in the same town as the Westboro folks and they are pretty much ignored (and despised) by all here. If I’m not mistaken, the ‘church’ is held within their home and the ‘congregation’ consists of the family members who haven’t changed their names and moved far, far away. They consider themselves chosen and their maniacal patriarch would claim that most people you’d consider “Christian” are going straight to he11.

    I’m another who has always disliked the term ‘good Christian” applied to anything. I don’t even like to see the advertisements for “Christian babysitters” that dominate ads for such services, because it implies that because they are Christian, they are trustworthy. When my kids were small, I remember thinking if I ever saw an ad for a “Moslem” or “Jewish” babysitter, I’d be sure to interview them first.

  • weese

    Bringing their christian religion front and center has actually prevented several contestants from advancing in this competition—I am thinking of Mandisa and Chris Sligh. But what it has done, is allow many to have careers after Idol that perhaps would not have if people didn’t know of their christianness. So if you don’t think you can make the top two(guaranteed contract), it is advantageous to make sure everyone knows how religious you are.

  • BootStar

    I was shocked that MTV went to this Brokaw woman as the de facto spokesperson for “Christians.” In the evangelical lexicon, the term “Christian” refers only to born-again Christians. I spent many years in that world, and Catholics, Orthodox Christians, and mainline Protestants–not to mention Mormons and Jehovah’s Witnesses–are not considered true Christians, i.e. they aren’t yet “saved.” This is why you will often hear the term “believer” used instead of “Christian.”

    That being said, even within this evangelical world, there are fundamentalists, charismatics, pentecostals and any number of different theologies on which they base their faith. For this Brokaw person to speak so emphatically about “Christians” as if even within the evangelical world it’s some kind of monolithic voting bloc is simply preposterous.

    A lot of devout evangelicals would be offended by the very name “American Idol” to the point where they’d consider any Christian auditioning for the show to be seriously misguided at best, the sin of “idolatry” going directly against several of the Ten Commandments, if you want to get really literal in your interpretation of Scripture.

    By all means, MJ, please pen that response!

  • LK09

    This is one of the things that turned me off Jason, Brooke and David A. last yearà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦I honestly find it so damn off-putting.

    Like Cruz, I never saw any of those three talk about their religion on AI at all. They may have been asked in an interview sometime, so of course they would answer.

  • soundscene

    This is one of the things that turned me off Jason, Brooke and David A. last yearà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦I honestly find it so damn off-putting.

    You mean the mere fact that they were religious was off-putting? You know, since none of them actually discussed their religion on the show. Or even made any ambiguous reference to it.

  • http://www.myspace.com/rjveritas MrRJ

    The Beautiful Baxter speaks truth. This is a singing contest and I (and it seems most of us who watch) enjoy the singing and the competition. I wouldn’t be for or against anyone because of their faith or lack of it. I don’t care if they like boys or girls or both. I do have the requirement in my own mind that they be fundimentally kind in their treatment of other contestants and those they come in contact with.

  • judy

    So only Christians have values such as helping other people? And she can tell the difference between Christians and non-Christians?

    This article and Ms. Brokaw’s opinions could not be more offensive to good, decent people who don’t belong to a Christian religon.

  • Grammie Kari

    Let’s see… oh yes, there is a category for Catholic Christians. That would be me. That article just rubbed me the wrong way.

    Danny Gokey, 28, Milwaukee, Wis., on what heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s all about: à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“I get my strength from my faith in God. My goal is to be a Christian who does mainstream music. I want my music to reach out to the multitudes. I want to bring entertainment, but I want to bring encouragement and hope at the same time.à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ 

    I think it was at this point that I decided there was an arrogance about Danny that I just didn’t like. However, he seems to be in a category by himself.

    Does it matter of Anoop is a Hindu? Does it matter that he is Danny’s roommate? There is a photo of Anoop hugging Danny after he finds out he didn’t get cut. I suspect that they do get along.

    MJ, how could you forget Carmen Rasmusen? She is the perfect example of someone who did not belong in the TOP 12, but she just kept coming back as others with more talent were eliminated. Of course, the Mormon Church is a huge voting block.

    This issue is so touchy. I just hope it doesn’t ruin the season. It seems some sort of “battleground” is being established. Ugh.

  • flynnsgirl

    There are so many articulate, eloquent people here, ya’ll should go comment on her piece of craptastic journalism.

  • lefty

    This article and Ms. Brokawà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s opinions could not be more offensive to good, decent people who donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t belong to a Christian religon.

    … and it is to many of us who do belong to one as well. (Of course as I’m married to a Jewish man my opinion won’t matter much to the OTT crazies anyway.) But seriously, no one I know, Christian or otherwise, would think this article was anything BUT offensive.

    I do have the requirement in my own mind that they be fundimentally kind in their treatment of other contestants and those they come in contact with.

    Yeah, me too…but just as I won’t vote for a jerk who sings well, I won’t vote for a saint who can’t sing. :)

  • baxter

    awwww thanks MrRJ….blushing!!!

    BTW….sooooo many months, so few poems…sigh!

  • ptslittlecomment

    It gets in the way and comes between people, this belief that one must à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“spread the Gospelà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  to others who donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t want it, donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t need it, have heard it all before and have made a conscious choice that they donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t want it, but their choice isnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t respected.

    Ahh, but I do respect your choice. Do you respect mine? As I said before, there is a great deal of difference between offering you a good new food and shoving it down your throat. You may have been offered that food before, and the person offering now never knew. But once you say “yes” or “no” then, yes, the offerer should respect your opinion and back off, even is he or she thinks you are missing out on the best food ever made. If the offerer already knew you didn’t like the food, then no, they shouldn’t offer. But that should not stop the offerer from enjoying their food either.
    Guys, I am going to stop now. I am not trying to convert anyone here. Someone asked a question and I tried to answer it. All of you have just as much right to your beliefs as I have to mine. And I deeply hate that many of you seem to be put off by the actions of someone calling themself a Christian (especially if it was me).
    I agree with MrRJ and I guess then Beautiful Baxter – and really everyone else who has said it. AI is a singing contest and faith is only one component of the contestants. Let them be who they are and vote for their ability to sing.

  • http://www.myspace.com/rjveritas MrRJ

    Oh my I really don’t know what to say
    My lack of poetry leaves me in dismay
    To Baxter I will write a poem today
    As beauty, and brains are her forte

  • lefty

    If the offerer already knew you didnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t like the food, then no, they shouldnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t offer. But that should not stop the offerer from enjoying their food either.

    Well put.

    I live in the Bible belt and I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve felt that someone was “shoving” their religion down my throat (and it hasn’t always been Christianity). Maybe I just tune it out or something, but I don’t meet too many people who are out to convert the masses. Am I just lucky? I find it rather distressing to hear that so many people perceive all Christians as overbearing and offensive, when in reality those folks are a really small percentage of the Christian population.

  • poporange

    Off subject—-(pj) here is some eyecandy
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMgLuaexl-Q

  • Chiqui

    I am really just puzzled by all these heated discussions relating to religion (or lack thereof) of both the AI contestants and the viewers.

    When I first got hooked on AI (which was only last season AI7 due to the talented Davids) all I’ve really cared about is whether the contestant is talented enough to move me to vote – regardless of gender, religion, or ethnicity.

    Personally, I am religious, but even now as I follow AI8, not once have I ever been moved to vote for someone because he/she is Christian or non-Christian.

    Don’t care if contestant is or claims to be the most spiritual and religious, or claims to be the most liberal and material-minded – if he/she isn’t impressing me with his/her talent and performance – he/she ain’t getting my vote!

  • baxter

    SQUEEEEEEE…yes I went there. And in keeping with todays theme…MrRJ has me all verklempt. Sure have missed you these long months my dear. You just made my day…..sigh…..

    :redface_wp:

    You have me all flush
    and turned me to mush
    oh what a rush
    my dear internet crush

  • weareallinnocent

    Chiqui, fwiw, though the conversation here seems freestanding at times, we’re actually discussing comments made in the MTV article linked above. Hope knowing that gives you some context for at least this discussion.

  • http://www.AuthorsTeam.com ghostwriter

    Regarding Carmen Rasmussen being voted in by the Mormon bloc, I think that’s highly unlikely.

    During Season 2, I literally believed AI was somehow rigged and that there was something wrong with how Carmen kept getting through.

    Then I watched Season 3 and saw John Stevens make it to the same ranking.

    It was obvious that tweens loved one of their own and that they were the ones who kept both Stevens and Rasmussen in.

    They are a powerful voting bloc in Idol– and lack of talent didn’t matter so much in those early idol seasons where there was only one 16 year old.

  • LaurelG

    Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m a bit off-topic as far as the comments go, wanted to say something about the gay issue brought up in The Advocate and EW articles. I think a big reason why Adam Lambert is sailing thru is because of his glam rock black eyeliner kick-ass vibe. … And it helps that heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s no pushover and looks like he doesnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t care what you think.

    Speaking of these articles, why are mainstream publications like EW and the LA times even writing them in the first place? Adam has chosen not to talk about his sexuality or his private life at all and the articles dutifully report this fact, then go on to say, but hey, we’ve seen the pictures *wink, wink* so now let’s discuss the hot topic “why aren’t gays allowed out of the closet on AI?” I realize some might say, “well, it’s the 2 ton elephant in the room,” (and for the record I’m not in fantard denial about Adam) but the fact remains Adam has not promoted himself as the next gay Idol, so what gives these papers the right to use him as a springboard for their “discussions” about homosexuality and the American phenomenon that is AI. I can just imagine some editor telling his or her reporter, “okay, I need a 1500 word piece on AI, how about working the gay angle with that Lambert kid?” Something to sell papers, ya know?

    It’s a different situation with Danny. He has openly and repeatedly talked about his church affiliation and his desire to “inspire” people with his singing or his message or whatever. In my opinion, talking about that is fair game. But Adam has not said word one about his sexual leanings and he certainly could have if he wanted to. I think what he truly wants is to be a pop/rock star and he’s seasoned enough to know if he ever came out with an explicit statement, there are enough “Christians” (like Ms. Brokaw) out there who would not only vote for anyone else but him but would also actively campaign against him.

    Anyway, sorry for the rant. It just frosts me that journalists write these articles under the guise of being “thoughtful” pieces. Even though the tone is all “why can’t we just be more open and accepting,” the reality is change is a process and we’re not there yet. I’m all for talking about it. Just don’t force Adam to be your poster child and torpedo his chances on this show at the same time.

  • oceana

    As I said before, there is a great deal of difference between offering you a good new food and shoving it down your throat.

    I think it’s unrealistic to think that anyone in this country hasn’t already heard about Christianity and the Bible, and made up their own mind if they are interested or not. If they are interested, they know where to buy a Bible, and how to look up churches in the yellow pages. Nobody has to “offer” Christianity to them. It offends me when complete strangers walk up to me and try to hand me pamphlets about Jesus. It’s very presumptious. It presumes that they have something that I want, and also that they know what I think about God, Jesus, the Bible, and many other things, which they don’t know. I have studied the Bible and many other religious writings, and I have my own beliefs.

    Christians often do not realize how it feels to others to be subjected to their desire to spread the gospel.

  • LK09

    Of course, the Mormon Church is a huge voting block.

    Just as I would never asume all Catholics or Jews or protestants would vote a certain way, I would never assume all Mormons would vote a certain way.

  • flynnsgirl

    Speaking of these articles, why are mainstream publications like EW and the LA times even writing them in the first place? Adam has chosen not to talk about his sexuality or his private life at all and the articles dutifully report this fact, then go on to say, but hey, weà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ve seen the pictures *wink, wink* so now letà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s discuss the hot topic à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“why arenà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t gays allowed out of the closet on AI?à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  I realize some might say, à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“well, ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s the 2 ton elephant in the room,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  (and for the record Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m not in fantard denial about Adam) but the fact remains Adam has not promoted himself as the next gay Idol, so what gives these papers the right to use him as a springboard for their à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“discussionsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  about homosexuality and the American phenomenon that is AI. I can just imagine some editor telling his or her reporter, à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“okay, I need a 1500 word piece on AI, how about working the gay angle with that Lambert kid?à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  Something to sell papers, ya know?

    Ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s a different situation with Danny. He has openly and repeatedly talked about his church affiliation and his desire to à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“inspireà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  people with his singing or his message or whatever. In my opinion, talking about that is fair game. But Adam has not said word one about his sexual leanings and he certainly could have if he wanted to. I think what he truly wants is to be a pop/rock star and heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s seasoned enough to know if he ever came out with an explicit statement, there are enough à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Christiansà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  (like Ms. Brokaw) out there who would not only vote for anyone else but him but would also actively campaign against him.

    Anyway, sorry for the rant. It just frosts me that journalists write these articles under the guise of being à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“thoughtfulà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  pieces. Even though the tone is all à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“why canà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t we just be more open and accepting,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  the reality is change is a process and weà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢re not there yet. Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m all for talking about it. Just donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t force Adam to be your poster child and torpedo his chances on this show at the same time.

    All of this is so perfectly put!

    My statement about the crazies picketing and spewing the hate were directly related to this:

    I think what he truly wants is to be a pop/rock star and heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s seasoned enough to know if he ever came out with an explicit statement, there are enough à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Christiansà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  (like Ms. Brokaw) out there who would not only vote for anyone else but him but would also actively campaign against him.

    It doesn’t matter about all the wonderful church going christian people out there it only takes one or 2 people to get the fire going. I actually worry about Adam making it through this with out some kind of hateful backlash..

  • lefty

    ^^oceana, I agree with your first paragraph. My problem is with this statement:

    Christians often do not realize how it feels to others to be subjected to their desire to spread the gospel.

    … because it, to me, suggests that all, or most, Christians are out there preaching on the streets, and we are not. I ask you this sincerely, out of curiosity: how often are you approached by someone trying to spread the gospel? As I said above, I live in a city where you are often asked where you go to church before you’re asked what you do for a living. Even here I don’t get approached like that. People do talk about going to church, and they talk about their faith, but they don’t tell me what to do. Do I feel comfortable with it? Not always. For me, faith is a very personal thing. But I think it’s important to realize that talking about it and pushing it onto others are two separate things entirely. Either way, I’m not going to get defensive about it.

  • lefty

    I think what he truly wants is to be a pop/rock star and heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s seasoned enough to know if he ever came out with an explicit statement, there are enough à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Christiansà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  (like Ms. Brokaw) out there who would not only vote for anyone else but him but would also actively campaign against him.

    I may be naive, but I think that when it comes to American Idol voters, people like Ms. Brokaw will be vastly outnumbered by those who couldn’t care less whether Adam is gay. And for every loser who chooses to campaign against him, there will be at least one fan who will campaign in his favor.

    I really like everything I’ve seen of Adam as a person. I don’t care at all for his singing. And I do think it’s a shame that his sexual orientation is being dragged into this at all, even by those who support it, because it just shouldn’t matter in a singing competition. Having said that, I’m sure he’s smart enough to know that it’s all up for grabs once you put yourself on national TV.

  • Grammie Kari

    Of course the contestants are different people going to appeal to different segments of the audience, but to topload the show with an overabundance of one type of person, i.e. Christian worship leaders, is lopsided and will displease as many as it pleases. Perhaps many Christians like it and see nothing wrong with it, but others are very much offput by it.

    Oceana, I noticed this a few weeks ago and mentioned that Rupert Murdoch, a conservative evangelical Christian, ran the show at Fox network. I believe this was part of the plan for this season. Set up the “holy” people against those who he may consider wacko. Look at the “cast of characters” in the TOP 36 (or even earlier) and there is definitely a divide.

    The religious beliefs of Jason, Brooke and David A. was not a turn off last year. They never came across like Danny or even Mandisa.

  • lefty

    The religious beliefs of Jason, Brooke and David A. was not a turn off last year. They never came across like Danny or even Mandisa.

    I agree! If I recall, they only mentioned it in interviews when asked VERY SPECIFIC questions. I think Chikezie may have said something more overt than any of those 3, and it was veeeerrrrry nonspecific. As fans who researched their backgrounds, we knew more about them than they revealed on the show. That’s very different from someone like Danny who chooses to mention it and then talks about reaching the masses.

  • weareallinnocent

    Just donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t force Adam to be your poster child and torpedo his chances on this show at the same time.

    Yes. This. And, I’ve noted the same before — though not nearly as eloquently as you. Thank you. I do feel that the media are burdening Adam (maybe involuntarily) with a hell of a cross to bear (pun intended) in hope for social progress.

    I also totally hear you all on Christian issue, the stereotypes that are no more fair than any other. But, after reading that MTV article, it really is hard to ignore that Ms Brokaw’s (and the other person quoted) views, as stated, *seem* to be a fairly prevalent way of Christian thinking. She certainly offers it as such, and the article’s author presents it that way by including no other views. After all, she’s the one quoted, not the fair minded, rational, balanced, open minded folks posting here. :-)

    It doesn’t help that some of us have experienced it just that way, too. For instance, it has been my experience that, whether approached on the street or not, there are those (and I believe they are many, depending on where you are) who feel if you don’t live a certain way — attend the right church at all the right times, condemn choice and homosexuality (which is, of course according to them, a choice), vote Republican, and only associate with those who do the same — you are not a “good Christian” and most likely appear on every prayer chain in town. In addition, these matters and others like them are not subjects for discussion or debate, at least not among *true believers*.

    Sorry, but this is my experience and I suspect it’s been the same for others too. As whacko as it may sound to some of you, it does happen. Believe me.

  • glitch

    deleted

  • lefty

    For instance, it has been my experience that, whether approached on the street or not, there are those (and I believe they are many, depending on where you are) who feel if you donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t live a certain way à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  attend the right church at all the right times, condemn choice and homosexuality (which is, of course according to them, a choice), vote Republican, and only associate with those who do the same à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  you are not a à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“good Christianà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  and most likely appear on every prayer chain in town. In addition, these matters and others like them are not subjects for discussion or debate, at least not among *true believers*.

    You know, weareallinnocent, you are absolutely right about this. It’s likely – no, certain – that I’m on some of those prayer lists myself due to the choices I’ve made in my life. But I guess I still bristle at claims that ALL Christians are like this, because, well, it’s just not true. It’s a classic case of bad apples, I know, but it makes me sad.

    And frankly, I still think this is different from being openly preached to, which is the frequent experience so many people allude to having. If someone decides to judge me, that’s their problem, not mine. They are free to worry about my soul to their hearts’ content. I’m quite sure people judge me on my hair, my crappy car, the behavior of my children, and the way I run my business every day as well. It’s only when they decide to try to tell me what to do that I let it get under my skin. And I find that THAT doesn’t really happen that often.

  • http://myspace.com/girlgeek mj

    It doesnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t matter about all the wonderful church going christian people out there it only takes one or 2 people to get the fire going. I actually worry about Adam making it through this with out some kind of hateful backlash..

    Don’t worry, there are already AI fans praying for Adam to be released from his sad, horrible, evil life. They pray that he heals his relationship with his father, because, of course, it’s his “broken” relationship that has caused his gayness, not any of that nasty science stuff like genetics…

    And no, I am not kidding or exaggerating.

  • Grammie Kari

    Regarding Carmen Rasmussen being voted in by the Mormon bloc, I think thatà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s highly unlikely.

    During Season 2, I literally believed AI was somehow rigged and that there was something wrong with how Carmen kept getting through.


    ghostwriter
    , this was a major issue of discussion. Simon selected Carmen as a W/C choice and before you know it, Carmen was “Goat Girl”. I posted at a Political forum with several Mormons and they were told to support Carmen. At least that’s what they said. If you do a Goggle search, this comes up in several articles.

    However, it was Carmen, herself who discussed the matter 3 years ago on the Joe Scarsborough Show (evening edition). He had her as a guest and openly discussed this issue. Now there were many teens of other faith that voted for her, but there was organized events.

    In fact, one of the first Idols to verify the manupulation of the judges and the scripted moments was Carmen. Later, Kellie and others told the same stories.

    Just as I would never assume all Catholics or Jews or protestants would vote a certain way, I would never assume all Mormons would vote a certain way.

    LK09, I am sorry if my comment bothers you. It was wrong of me to assume others knew about this. It was on the Internet and in the newspapers. Carmen was very happy to have her church’s support. Of course, there were lots of fans. However, there came a point when…

    Oh, never mind. I have expressed my opinion and do not want to argue with any ones here. This is such a great blog.

  • lefty

    ^^ now that, MJ, I believe. Without a doubt.

    They pray that he heals his relationship with his father, because, of course, ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s his à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“brokenà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  relationship that has caused his gayness

    This makes me chuckle (even though you are right), because anyone who’s paid attention can see that Adam appears to have the most loving, supportive parents on the planet.

  • soundscene

    Ok, totally unrelated to religion at all, but some of the European iTunes stores now have DA’s “Somebody Out There” and “Works For Me” available as individual singles. If you try to get to these downloads in the US store a message pops up saying they will be available in the US iTunes store on March 17, 2009. The album was available a few days ahead of time in European iTunes stores so that’s not surprising. SOT was an iTunes pre-order bonus track, so nobody got it unless they pre-ordered on iTunes. WFM was a regular iTunes bonus track. Both were co-written by DA.

    The official artwork for the singles are here and here.

  • lefty

    Ok, totally unrelated to religion at all

    *sigh of relief*

    Thanks for the scoop, soundscene!

  • frogcooke

    Thats really interesting. It will be cool if indeed they do come out on the 17th. Since SOT was pre order only.

  • Hazehel

    I don’t know if this has been posted before, but Nashville Star has been cancelled by NBC. No indications of whether the show will return to cable or if it is gone forever –

    http://tvseriesfinale.com/articles/2008-2009-cancelled-shows-nbc-cancels-10-television-series/

  • bjesgirl

    Well, I only go to church because my dad makes me. I just sit there and play with my nintendo DS. I don’t know if that makes me a christian or what.

    Either way, contestants don’t loose or gain points from me based on their religions. I absolutely deteste the mormon “religion,” and am strongly against the evangelical movement, but I don’t really think it’s fair to judge people who are part of that- it’s their own deal. I usually don’t even know the idols’ religions. The only reason I know about Archie and Jason is because their religious fans keep yapping about it. I’ve never actually heard either of them speak about their religions. Even if they did, it’s not like I’m at risk of getting converted, so whatevs.

    If there are people voting based on religion, then that’s too bad. I’m sure there’s a few gay people who will support Adam regardless, and some black people who will support Lil even if she sucks. It’s annoying, but it happens.

  • yummystars

    I agree with the comment that mainstream publications shouldn’t even be bringing Adam’s sexual orientation up. Esp. now that “out here” in the world, I honestly feel we’re beyond it. Dave White writing in The Advocate, happy that Adam’s orientation doesn’t seem to be much of an issue yet, that’s where I’m coming from by saying it has a lot to do with his genre though. If Adam were singing Christian Rock or Country, it would be an issue. But with a style that might be close to glam rock, where androgyny is the calling card, Adam’s eyeliner look just seems well kinda homey (no pun intended)!

    I mean really, Little Richard, Mick Jaggar, Bowie, Freddie Mercury, Elton John, we’ve been thru all this years ago. I think we’re grown up enough now as a culture that it certainly doesn’t matter anymore, at least in rock. People will expect the outre in certain genres but not in others.

    And certainly nobody cares when gay men show up on Project Runway or America’s Next Top Model or Shear Genius or The Fashion Police or whatever. I don’t see what is the big deal, esp. with a cool character like Adam who doesn’t seem to care what people think anyway and who already has lots of connections and experience in LA with or without AI.

    I didn’t even read the Christian Right article or whatever it was that these comments mostly touch on. But I do read Dave White and I hope he’s right by saying we may be beyond all this as a society.

    I’m still steamed about the different format this season. I think a lot of good people got left behind for no reason. But I do think Alexis is good and I like Adam too even though to tell the truth, I’m not all that into his rocker sound so far. But he is really good and I wanna see what he’s gonna do in his career.

  • cookcricket

    Kelly Clarkson is the musical guest on SNL tonight! Sorry if this has been posted already.

  • kathrynTX

    Sigh. If people are free to practice and believe whatever religion they please in this country, I am just as free to be offended by their witnessing and harassing me about it, especially when I’ve clearly said I’M NOT INTERESTED. I tell someone no, I don’t believe and that seems to be his/her cue to start telling me why I SHOULD and what will happen to me if I don’t blahlbahblah…and in the end, s/he ends up sounding like a smug self-righteous idiot. This has happened to me many times, with many people who call themselves Christians. I’m not calling them that, THEY do. These people have been very close friend of many years, relatives, and those annoying men who come to my front door at 9AM on Saturday morning – whom I have told 3 frigging times now I’M NOT INTERESTED. I just don’t answer the door now. What do I have to do, get a restraining order against them? GEEZ.

    I am offended by people at my workplace talking loudly about their religious beliefs. Let’s not talk religion, politics, or sex at work, please. I’ve said that over & over. I’m not rude or loud. I usually just shut my door. I can guarantee these people would complain to management about ME if I told them I found their conversations offensive…maybe I should anyway cause they won’t STFU.

    Oh wait, religious discussion and such on AI…can we keep the religious crap on the religious channels, please? I DON’T WANT TO HEAR IT. This WILL keep me from watching all of AI. And I do not need some contestant on AI preaching at me, of all things. Argh. Get outta my face.

  • Cakenbake

    That MTV article is stupid. Christians make up about 75 percent of the population of the United States. So of course there are going to be some “Christian” singers when the majority of the population of the United States IS Christian.

    That is a stupid article. Most African-Americans who have been on the show started off in choirs in churches, even Jennifer Hudson. Does that mean all black singers are “Christians” on the show? Probably but the writer is labeling people, and trying to do it in a BIGOTED WAY. That is like targeting Elliott for being Jewish. What does their religion have anything thing to do with it when 76 percent of the country is Christian. That is like saying 50 percent of the country are women…well DUH.

  • Cakenbake

    Interesting that people will write bigoted articles about the Christians on the show and people see them as acceptable. Who cares if there are Christians on the show? Who cares if there are gay people on the show? Who cares if there are more men then women on the show? When idiots write articles questioning Christians, gays and others that shows their ignorance. If the writer is a Christian and writes about other Christians, or if the writer is gay and writes about other gays on the show that is different. Now is Gil Kaufman a Christian? Then why is he making bigoted prejudice articles if he is not. If he was writing from the inside then that is different, but if he is not one then why write WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW ABOUT? Unless you have preconceived bigoted concepts.

  • cookcricket

    Kelly looked and sounded great on SNL!

  • Deejay

    Yeah, I don’t care about these people’s backgrounds. And I don’t think most viewers care that much either. All I can say is, anecdotally, my mother has some pretty conservative Christian beliefs (if you know what I mean), and she loves Adam to pieces. When I called her the other day, she said she’s seen everything there is to see about him on the internet, including cabaret videos and the photos of him kissing a man. She didn’t care about any of that; she just cared that he was incredibly talented.

    On the other hand, she’s not enthused by Danny at all. She doesn’t think he’s anywhere near Adam in vocal or performance skills. She doesn’t think he has the chops to win, didn’t even like his last performance, and thinks everyone’s voting for him due to the wife backstory.

    I think my mom, and many others like her, deserve credit for knowing that there’s a time and place for everything. To her, AI is about talent and music; that’s all.

  • noctem seizure

    Why is the MTV article making people upset? African American viewers often support African American contestants. Gay viewers likely support gay contestants. Jewish viewers are probably have a certain inclination to support Jewish contestants. So why shouldn’t Christian viewers support Christian contestants?

  • weareallinnocent

    ^^That’s not all the article said, noctem. And, in context, that’s not all it seems to mean. That’s all I’m saying. :-)

  • brextra

    Just donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t force Adam to be your poster child and torpedo his chances on this show at the same time.

    Yes. This. And, Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ve noted the same before à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  though not nearly as eloquently as you. Thank you. I do feel that the media are burdening Adam (maybe involuntarily) with a hell of a cross to bear (pun intended) in hope for social progress.

    I’ve been concerned about the poster child thing too. I do think – and HOPE – that Adam is smart enough to navigate all that is being thrown at him. So far, he seems to be. He went through hell in the media, and then he performs on AI last week with a nice little emphasis on the word “equality.” And I think the fact that Seacrest has not made any jokes at his expense speaks to Adam’s ability to navigate this, appear confident, and stand up for himself. I will be PISSED if Seacrest does make any jokes at his expense. How offensive.

    Donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t worry, there are already AI fans praying for Adam to be released from his sad, horrible, evil life. They pray that he heals his relationship with his father, because, of course, ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s his à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“brokenà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  relationship that has caused his gayness, not any of that nasty science stuff like geneticsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦

    And no, I am not kidding or exaggerating.

    I found those people incredibly offensive. I have nothing against people praying for Adam for whatever reason they wish. People are free to pray for whatever they want. But to put it out there on the INTERNET for all (including Adam) to see? It’s not like he’s going to appreciate their care and concern, for crying out loud! And to make presumptions about his relationship with his father!? Especially when that contradicts everything we’ve seen or heard about them. Argh.

  • oceana

    Who cares if there are Christians on the show? Who cares if there are gay people on the show? Who cares if there are more men then women on the show?

    I suppose if there were 4 or 5 overtly gay people on the show, and gay people were a huge voting block that was going to keep them there a long time no matter how they sang, that could be conceived as a problem.

    It has always seemed that people are kept on the show by certain voting blocs, Hawaii voters helped Jasmin, black voters help black contestants, gay voters vote for certain contestants that resonate with them, etc. Voting blocs are unavoidable, but when the show loads up with too many of one demographic, then it feels lopsided and potentially unfair, so people get concerned or annoyed.

    And more men than women can be a problem when more voters seem to be women and they tend to vote more for the men, at least that’s one possible theory.

  • oceana

    Donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t worry, there are already AI fans praying for Adam to be released from his sad, horrible, evil life. They pray that he heals his relationship with his father, because, of course, ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s his à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“brokenà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  relationship that has caused his gayness, not any of that nasty science stuff like geneticsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦

    I read something interesting lately, in a book about a boy whose gender was changed surgically when he was an infant (because of a botched circumcision). It was about the theory that men become gay because they have distant fathers and over-attached mothers. Apparently studies showed the opposite, that gay men usually showed differences when they were kids, they didn’t bond with their fathers over “manly” things like football, and the fathers were bothered by their effeminate ways and thus kept away from them, becoming “distant fathers”, while the mothers tended to bond with the boys to compensate for the distant father, and also because the boys liked things that she, a female, liked, i.e. cooking and clothes, etc.

    In other words, which came first, the chicken or the egg? These studies showed that being gay came first, and the family dynamics came as a result of that, not the other way around. Which makes sense to me.

  • Tess

    “Why is the MTV article making people upset? African American viewers often support African American contestants. Gay viewers likely support gay contestants. Jewish viewers are probably have a certain inclination to support Jewish contestants. So why shouldnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t Christian viewers support Christian contestants?”

    Since the only thing you can’t hide on TV is the color of your skin, if someone wants to vote race they have an easy way of determining who they should vote for. Unless the contestant, whether through interviews or family clips or the pre-song blips, speaks or alludes to their religious affiliation, their politics, or their sexual preferences the voter only has assumptions to help formulate their votes. I don’t care if a contestant
    wants to garner votes by expressing any of these things…but I don’t want the media to run with assumptions and cram them down my throat and then tell their “constituents” that they should vote or not vote for people based on those assumptions.

  • noctem seizure

    Since the only thing you canà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t hide on TV is the color of your skin, if someone wants to vote race they have an easy way of determining who they should vote for. Unless the contestant, whether through interviews or family clips or the pre-song blips, speaks or alludes to their religious affiliation, their politics, or their sexual preferences the voter only has assumptions to help formulate their votes. I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t care if a contestant
    wants to garner votes by expressing any of these thingsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦but I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t want the media to run with assumptions and cram them down my throat and then tell their à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“constituentsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  that they should vote or not vote for people based on those assumptions.

    The point is that demographic-determined voting occurs anyway, and the article was just cursorily exploring the presence of the “Christian” demographic among contestants and in the audience. I just think that many people are sensitve about it in this case because religion is such a hot button issue. If the same article was written about those who are gay instead of those who are “Christians”, I doubt anyone would be taking offense. In fact, we’d all speak extremely delicately in order to make sure we stayed politically correct.

    But, as someone who was raised in a highly Christian background, but who is not really a part of it now, I can tell you that I still can pick up cues that tell me that somebody has the same religious affiliation that I had, even when it’s not stated. There is a distinct “God-dar” that people from that faith background have, and that was the only point the article made that I could see even being minorly controversial.

  • BootStar

    Donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t worry, there are already AI fans praying for Adam to be released from his sad, horrible, evil life. They pray that he heals his relationship with his father, because, of course, ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s his à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“brokenà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  relationship that has caused his gayness, not any of that nasty science stuff like geneticsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦

    And no, I am not kidding or exaggerating.

    I’ve seen them too. Top Idol has done quite a bit of cataloguing this stuff:

    Ah yes, ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s all SATANà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢S FAULT. Satan controls DNA! Hmmm, I just heard something. The sound of Watson and Crick rolling over in their graves. I wonder if I can win a Nobel Prize for determining the double helix of stupidity.

    “Lord, save Adam. He seems so confident. Yet, yes, so lost. I pray that he does befriend the Christian men on the show and is shown how man was made in Your image and help Adam to know he is a man. I ask that his father is able to befriend him. Somewhere along the line, their relationship was ruined or never did really gel. I pray that they become friends. Save this poor, confused soul, Lord. He needs You. In Your name, Father, amen.”

    Wait. So Adam thinks he is a woman? Of course! No wonder he went on Idol. What better way to gain access to gaggles of overweight Frauen? Heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s just doing this to make a WOMAN SUIT out of all of you! Jesus, help this man!!! (And Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m sure Lambertà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s father, who was shown cheering for his son in the audience, would love to know youà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢re praying for their relationship to be repaired since he obviously failed him as a father, thereby turning him GAY.)

    If Jesus were alive, he would smack all of you upside the head.

    The thing that’s so offensive about these prayers for Adam, in addition to the fact that these folks think it’s perfectly okay to write such hurtful, erroneous claims on a public forum, is that I believe that Adam’s dad is Jewish. I don’t know one way or the other if the family is religious, but AFAIK, in the Conservative, Reformed, and Reconstructionist branches of Judaism, there is nothing verboten about homosexuality. So these prayer folks are make some outrageous assumptions.

  • TreeFrog

    Why is the MTV article making people upset? African American viewers often support African American contestants. Gay viewers likely support gay contestants. Jewish viewers are probably have a certain inclination to support Jewish contestants. So why shouldnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t Christian viewers support Christian contestants?

    Or maybe North Carolina barbequeists will band together this year to support Anoop. Heh. I have no problem with any organized voter blocs on Idol. Creating (and keeping) one is part of the game for contestants and it is natural the first place to look would be among one’s own demographic. If sympathetic media who share their point of view give them some pimpage other than what the show rather unevenly provides, well, so be it. No one ever won Idol on singing ability alone and never will.

    I get the feeling, though, from reading many of the responses that much of the problem is not necessarily with group advocacy but with difficult experiences with various Christian denominations. Denominationism is by nature divisive and it could be argued that none of them paints an accurate picture of Christianity. However, even if one strips away all the churchy crap of the past couple of thousand years, Christianity itself is still polarizing. The bottom line from the beginning has been a simple yes or no question: Do you believe Christ died for your sins? Either it is true or it isn’t and one is free to choose either answer, but the two sides cannot be reconciled.

  • noctem seizure

    All right, I actually took the time to read through this entire thread, and what I see is a two page conflagration that happened because people took a quote from a source in an article and read a meaning and context into it that may not even have been there.

  • weareallinnocent

    people took a quote from a source in an article and read a meaning and context into it that may not even have been there

    I like your phrasing, and that you expressly leave open the possibility that some people did read the actual meaning and context, as presented. Although, we probably will never be sure (or agree on) who among us did that, and who did not. :-)

  • LaurelG

    “Even if contestants don’t come out and say it, we can all spot someone [who is Christian]. The more that there are contestants that we can connect with à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  who we can say, ‘That person is like me’ à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  the more it will probably help drive viewership this year,” Brokaw said, pointing to a moment on Tuesday’s performance show when the judges praised Allen for helping other contestants work on their songs, which Brokaw said brought a knowing nod from Christians who know of his church background.

    This is just one offensive paragraph from that article and I believe the “meaning and context” of the italicized verbiage is clear. What many in this thread have said is that this woman has articulated a not-so-subtle us versus them mentality that they find obnoxious and presumptuous (me included). Just as there are many non-”Christians” who are kind, generous and helpful and would have done what Kris did in a heartbeat, there are also many “Christians” who although they espouse a certain belief (talk the talk) fail to live up to those same ideals in their own lives (walk the walk). There are plenty of both kinds in each camp. Ms. Brokaw and her fellow “Christians,” whoever they may be, haven’t cornered the market on kindness and generosity.

    By the way, I put the word “Christian” in quotes because, as mj pointed out upthread, this woman seems to represent a branch (twig?) of Christianity that would probably exclude most of the mainstream Christians posting here.

  • Grammie Kari

    I think Chikezie may have said something more overt than any of those 3, and it was veeeerrrrry nonspecific.

    I watched Season 7 – Top Twelve (Beatles) this afternoon. This was when AI showed the baby pictures and spoke with the parents. Chikezie does mention his faith. His (Nigerian) Mom went further and also said they played religious music and love songs in the home.

    It is wonderful that AI had him on two tours with other Idols.

    Does Adam attend any church? I ask only because of all this debate.

  • judy

    noctem seizure – Nice try, but the direct quotes from this Brokaw woman and what she meant were quite clear and quite offensive.

    Now I don’t particularly care if contestants are religous or not religous – I just care about how they sing. If they are active or work/sing in their church and it’s a part of their life, I don’t mind that being mentioned in their background videos as it has been done in previous years. But this season, it seems to have gone further than that, especially with Gokey’s shameless, calculating use of a personal tragedy toget noticed and bring his message of whatever it is that he is trying to sell to the multitudes. And American Idol seems all too happy to help him in his little ‘mission’. When I want religon, I go to a church; when I want to hear some music and singing, I watch American Idol. I don’t like mixing the two. So if the show continues down this path and becomes Christian Idol instead of American Idol, I’m done watching it.

    Now there’s an idea……..Christian Idol. Not for me, but it seems there’s a market out there for it. Somenoe should pitch it to Simon.

  • noctem seizure

    Here’s what we have– a quote from a woman in response to a question. We don’t know what question she was asked specifically because it’s not an interview transcript. The writer of the piece merely inserted that quote because it supported the particular point(s) he was trying to establish. Furthermore, we don’t even know if it’s a complete quote, because the author may have only included the part that he deemed relevant. There may have been parts of the full quote that were lopped off that completely change the context.

    I could go on and on about the many elements at play here that could have caused the intent of her meaning to become distorted or lost, but to me there’s a much more salient observation to be made. And that is many people who were upset by what they think the woman is saying are predisposed to think that “someone like her” would say something like that.

  • Lys

    Noctem, I think I love you.

  • judy

    noctem seizure – hhhmmmmmmmmm……..I think you are way off base and I don’t think her intent was distorted at all. Seems Ms. Brokaw thinks that MTV did a fine job according to her blog at Beliefnet.

    “Check out Kaufman’s article; he did a great job……….”

    here’s the link

    http://blog.beliefnet.com//gospelsoundcheck/2009/03/mtv-features-gospel-soundcheck.html

  • weareallinnocent

    Here’s what I think, without going back and reading anything at all. LOL

    I think we all have had whatever experiences we have, both in life and in religion, and we’ve suffered or those we care about have suffered at the hands of whatever we have, and sometimes that includes matters of religion or those offering/selling it. And, sometimes those offering/selling it have suffered too. Then we read an article like the one above, including the quotes (with or without adequate context) and we take away what we do. Among the possibilities, we’re neutral (remote, I know lol), we’re offended, we’re defensive. Whatever.

    But, noctem, notwithstanding that we appear to disagree on the larger point here, I do appreciate that you recognized that the God-dar might be viewed as offensive — both for the alleged fact of it, as well as the substantive claim. It IS offensive to suggest that kind acts toward others are among the exclusive values of Christians, all of them. No group can be fairly stereotyped, good or bad, so long as they’re made up of people. And, that’s the point, at least to me.

  • noctem seizure

    noctem seizure – hhhmmmmmmmmmà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦..I think you are way off base and I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t think her intent was distorted at all. Seems Ms. Brokaw thinks that MTV did a fine job according to her blog at Beliefnet.

    à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Check out Kaufmanà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s article; he did a great jobà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦Ãƒ ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦.à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ 

    hereà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s the link

    http://blog.beliefnet.com//gospelsoundcheck/2009/03/mtv-features-gospel-soundcheck.html

    I doubt she’s perused this thread to see how her comments were received in certain quarters. But, if you want to clear this up it’s a simple matter to go post a question on her blog and ask her if she believes that Christians are the only people who are generous with their time and would help others even if it wasn’t to their advantage.

    To me, it’s fairly apparent that if you interpret her statement as worded to mean that, there is at least a possibility that you have some some preconceptions about individuals who come from her background that align with that interpretation….

  • noctem seizure

    But, noctem, notwithstanding that we appear to disagree on the larger point here, I do appreciate that you recognized that the God-dar might be viewed as offensive à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  both for the alleged fact of it, as well as the substantive claim. It IS offensive to suggest that kind acts toward others are among the exclusive values of Christians, all of them. No group can be fairly stereotyped, good or bad, so long as theyà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢re made up of people. And, thatà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s the point, at least to me.

    Why is “God-dar” any more offensive than “gaydar”? I’m not offended by gaydar, and the persons of homosexual orientation that I have known in my life have been quite clear that it does exist. (I suppose you could be offended by the word God-dar used in this case to apply to a sense possessed by a given subset of Christians, but that was just my personal wordplay on “gaydar”)

    Also, if you read my post directly above this, I explain that I don’t believe she means to say that magnanimity is the singular domain of Christians. Looking at the article, I’m fairly confident that I can pinpoint exactly where the possible misreading is taking place. But, rather than getting into that detail, what is more striking to me is the fact that a definite element of pre-inclination to read her comments this way is present here.

    It’s analagous to the way we respond to the statements of elected officials we don’t like. If I don’t care for President Obama or former President Bush, then I’m going to listen to the things they say very skeptically and scrutinize their words critically. And if there’s a negative spin that can be applied to their statements, then I’m likely to accept that as my intepretation of what they said.

  • LaurelG

    But, noctem, I am a Christian and I’d never heard of this woman before (unlike Obama or Bush), so I had no pre-inclination to read her words one way or the other. Still, I was offended.

    And, fwiw, I think the term “gaydar” is fairly offensive too. It plays into a whole host of stereotypes.

  • judy

    noctem seizure – I give. lol I could do that, but really, I don’t care that much. Her comment is what it is and she didn’t seem to have any problem with it. Maybe she would say that she didn’t mean it in that context if asked, who knows. I actually read a few of her blogs and she seems very intelligent so I would think if she didn’t mean the quote to come across as written, she would have said something in her blog about it. Her blogs were fine. Her focus is Christian music, which did not come across very well in the MTV article, and she has her agenda, but whatever. The only comment I found odd in one of her blogs was that she knew Danny was a Christian just by looking at him. I didn’t quite get that. Does he glow? Is he better looking that non-christian people? I thought that was funny. I don’t like the idea of defining people as non-Christian and Christian – people are just people and one is not better than the other because of their religous beliefs or lack of. I think it’s devisive and non-inclusive, but, different strokes for different folks.

    I posted above why I’m not happy with AI this year and that really doesn’t have anything to do with Ms. Brokaw and her offensive remark. Actually, what I get from her blogs is that she has noticed the same thing I have. But she is thrilled and I am not.

    and so it goes……..but, hey, it’s been interesting discussing this with you!

  • weareallinnocent

    Yes, I’m just as offended by gaydar as goddar. But, consider the possibility that the logic you suggest, noctem, applies to you as well — with respect to interpreting the views of those who took offense. Why is it that the words and context as presented can’t just be offensive to some without stereotyping (as prejudiced) those who are offended?

  • http://myspace.com/girlgeek mj

    To me, ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s fairly apparent that if you interpret her statement as worded to mean that, there is at least a possibility that you have some some preconceptions about individuals who come from her background that align with that interpretationà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦.

    Wow. Talk about making assumptions! You’re questioning the motives of people that you don’t know.

    Pot Kettle Black?

  • noctem seizure

    Wow. Talk about making assumptions! Youà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢re questioning the motives of people that you donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t know.

    Pot Kettle Black?

    I could go back and copy-and-paste select quotes from this thread which expressly indicate that the persons making them already have some pretty strong, negative feelings toward people associated with this woman’s particular faith background. It’s a pretty logical step then to conclude that these feelings could at least partly shade their perception of what she said. And some of the posts I’m referring to actually say as much, if only saying so indirectly.

    Anyway, I wanted to express an alternative point of view that I didn’t see expressed here. I have done so, and others can agree with it, consider it, dismiss it, or have whatever other reaction that they wish. But, I’m not going to continue to go around and around about it.

  • http://myspace.com/girlgeek mj

    Anyway, I wanted to express an alternative point of view that I didnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t see expressed here. I have done so, and others can agree with it, consider it, dismiss it, or have whatever other reaction that they wish. But, Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m not going to continue to go around and around about it.

    I think what’s setting people off right now, is not your “alternate point of view” but your questioning their motives. And, actually, questioning your fellow posters’ motives and/or putting words in their mouths, is against the guidelines. Please make note of that.

    While there were a couple of people who made it clear that they didn’t care for religion all that much, there were also many self-identified Christians who didn’t care for her statements either. So, there’s your theory, right out the window.

  • weareallinnocent

    ^^I appreciate that, noctem, and I appreciate you offering the alternative view. Offering that view as your own, though, suggested something more, at least to me. That is, it’s as if you were saying that, because you weren’t offended when you read the article, then anyone who was offended must have come to the table with preconceived ideas. Problem is, the only way that logic holds is if You are the model of objectivity. :-) None among us is. At least we can agree on that, eh?

  • Grammie Kari

    The comment about knowing someone is a Christian by how they look or act just doesn’t always hold tru. I have a friend who is a minister (Bron Again Christian) and one that is Jeish. They both act and look the same…kind, loving people.

    This may not be a popular opinion, but Danny gives off different vibes than Kris or Michael. Ummm…let’s see, I don’t find Michael to be a sweet person. I admit he can sing.

  • Joanne Brokaw

    Hi, all! I wanted to just drop in quick to say that I really appreciate all of the discussion you’re having about that MTV article and the whole issue of Christianity on the show and in general.

    I totally understand why some of you are offended and apologize if those comments in the article came across as judgmental. They certainly weren’t intended to offend, and in a longer discussion I think you’d see that some of the assumptions about me based on those few sentences aren’t necessarily true.

    Anyway, yes, I cover Christian music for Beliefnet, so my job, in addition to covering typical CCM stuff, is to find hot mainstream stories and see how they relate to Christian music. Early on this season on Idol, I noticed a TON of worship leaders on the show, so I started following those contestants. When we got to the top 13, other people noticed that there seemed to be a lot of Christian contestants. (The Associated Press is doing a story this week, in addition to the MTV story.)

    I was in NO way advocating that Christians should vote for the Christian contestants. That’s stupid. But I did explain to the reporter that I’m sure that happens. If there’s one thing I understand, it’s the Christian consumer, and if you read my blog, you’ll find that I am a frequent critic of the commercialization of the church. (I mean, someone actually came out with a faith-based energy drink. I want to barf when I see that kind of stuff.)

    Anyway, just wanted to let you know that I have been trying to read as many of the comments as I can, and I appreciate both the negative (and few positive, LOL) thoughts. I’m not surprised; I have non-Christians who hate me, and Christians who pray for me because they think I’m not a Christian. I actually get feedback from Christian readers who say I shouldn’t even be watching American Idol, LOL. So I’m sure that that article upset people on both sides of the “faith fence.”

    If I can answer any questions, please don’t hesitate to head over to my blog and leave a comment on this post:
    http://blog.beliefnet.com/gospelsoundcheck/2009/03/mtv-features-gospel-soundcheck.html

    Thanks for taking time to read Gil’s article at MTV and for having a thoughtful and honest discussion about faith!

    All the best,
    Joanne

  • flynnsgirl

    Just wanted to add, I thought that this was a really interesting conversation. It was fun to “get into it” and read everyone’s opinions.
    Thank you Joanne for stopping by and letting us know your thoughts.
    Who woulda thought we could have this discussion on an AI blog!
    MJ for the win! ;-)

  • Joanne Brokaw

    Judy, you made this point: “…Danny was a Christian just by looking at him. I didnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t quite get that. Does he glow?” and it made me laugh. I knew Danny was a Christian because they said he was a church music teacher; I have no idea why I wrote that I knew from looking at him, LOL. I guess he does glow – I mean, he’s pretty joyful. But you’re right, what I said was weird.

    And I agree with your other comment about not wanting church on your tv show. I’m happy these contestants are there because they’re talented, not because they’re Christians. Sure, I’m glad to see them do well, but trust me, if I was just voting for the ones who used the name of Jesus or listed Bible verses on their MySpace, I’d have to vote for Tatiana – and that was most definitely NOT happening!

    Another reporter asked me if I thought Idol should do a night of Christian music and I told him absolutely not. It wouldn’t be fair to the contestants or the viewers. Idol isn’t a religious show. If a contestant wants to sing a Christian song – David Cook doing a Switchfoot tune, for example – he should be able to. But while it was interesting to see the Idols last season sing “Shout To The Lord,” I don’t think it was really fair to those who aren’t Christians.

    Joanne

  • judy

    Joanne – a faith based energy drink??? that’s funny.

    take care.

  • oceana

    But while it was interesting to see the Idols last season sing à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Shout To The Lord,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t think it was really fair to those who arenà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t Christians.

    Thank you!! I totally felt the same way.

  • Grammie Kari

    comment about knowing someone is a Christian by how they look or act just doesnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t always hold tru. I have a friend who is a minister (Bron Again Christian) and one that is Jewish. They both act and look the sameà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦kind, loving people.

    This may not be a popular opinion, but Danny gives off different vibes than Kris or Michael. Ummmà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦letà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s see, I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t find Michael to be a sweet person. I admit he can sing

    I tried to delete this post. I was distracted and it came out all wrong. I don’t find Danny to be a sweet person. (Sorry to Michael fans.) That is just my opinion.

    It is good to see your reply, Joanne. This has definitely been a hot topic and your response is appreciated. I don’t agree with all you said in the article, but at least you come across as more human.

  • Grammie Kari

    Oh my, that didn’t quite come out as I expected! LOL.

  • brextra

    But while it was interesting to see the Idols last season sing à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã…“Shout To The Lord,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬  I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t think it was really fair to those who arenà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t Christians.

    Thank you!! I totally felt the same way.

    Me too. That was one of the most awkward and miserable things I’ve ever sat through. It was one of those “peek through my fingers at the horror on screen” moments. I’m a Christian, but who on earth wants to watch a bunch of people who don’t believe in it sing it? Awkward, awkward, awkward. And the fact that they had to sing it more than once? If I’d been a contestant, I think that would have been my last day on the show, to tell you the truth. I think I would have quit right then and there.

  • Joanne Brokaw

    Grammie Kari – thanks! Gil and I actually talked for quite a while and obviously only a small portion could be used in the article. One thing he didn’t have room for was WHY I thought there might be so many Christians on the show this season. I did a post yesterday if you’re interested:
    http://blog.beliefnet.com/gospelsoundcheck/2009/03/4-reasons-why-there-are-so-man.html

    I think if a overtly Christian element brings in viewers, you may find more of that on shows like this, or at least more contestants with overtly Christian stories. It’s all about $$.

    All the best,
    Joanne

  • Mishle18

    My belief is that it is a talent competition, and people are free to vote whoever they want based on any reason (as it is them dialing the phones, lol). However AI is already evolving, as we have seen, the market is full of talented singers but not all of them “buyable”. Some people vote for talent, vocal prowess, and some people vote for the person they’d watch in a concert, buy the cd they make, etc. Overall, freedom to choose.

    Also, i guess, whatever contestants choose to play on their videos is entirely up to them. If family is a big motivation for their singing, if the theater is, or if God is, let them be. It is entirely up to them. It is their video, and the content of that the viewers cannot control. You can control who you wanna vote for though, so i don’t see why there’s so much hype over this issue.

    Lastly, I believe people don’t need to wear “name tags” for the public to see who they are. How you act towards others portray who you really are, your relationships, principles, and choices define who you are as an individual. :)

  • Mishle18

    Layla
    Mar 14th, 2009 at 11:44 am
    à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦and why do Christians like Danny want to push their beliefs on others??? They are always talking about spreading the wordà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦what word?

    I don’t really see him pushing his beliefs on other people, as he refers to it as a personal thing. No one can really know what’s in his mind. Some people say they believe one thing but their actions don’t mirror their words.

    I believe pushing your beliefs on someone entail saying “you should believe this thing i believe in”. Saying this is what i believe is just that, what i believe. No ‘you shoulds’ added to it. And the word i think you’re referring to is the Bible. :)

  • Mishle18

    And, just a word of encouragement or whatever it will be taken as. :) Some people have had bad experiences with christians or people claiming to be christians.

    The truth is, no matter how much we like it or not, there will always be christians who strive to be good, but at times fail, and there are christians who really don’t act like Christians. It’s not sounding preachy or anything, but the whole point of the matter is Christians are still human beings, they still make mistakes. Whoever Christian claims to be PERFECT is LYING!!

    also, if by chance we believed in love but have met several boyfriends or girlfriends who claimed to love us, but did not love us, left us and broke our hearts? Would we stop believing in love? Is our belief in love based on people showing Love or on Love itself? Think about it. There will always be people who misunderstand and misrepresent the concept of love, but it does not stop love from being love.

  • http://www.conversantlife.com/cjcasciotta cjcasciotta

    Hey Tess, Baxter, and the rest of you guys,
    First of all, thanks for voicing your opinions and calling this stuff into question. I think that’s extremely important for our culture to do rather than just accept what’s spoon-fed to us.

    Though I thoroughly enjoyed talking to the journalist and thought he wrote a good story, like many articles, the quotes used were only part of a larger conversation we were having over the phone and don’t represent my view as well as I had hoped.

    Let me clarify
    1) I completely agree with Baxter – you don’t have to be a Christian to do good and help others. We do that because there’s something deep within us as humans that makes us feel alive when we give life to others. You see it everyday. I personally think that it’s Christ who instills this in every human’s soul, regardless of their religion or background. That’s why I follow Christ and his story… of giving everything he had (even his own life) to humanity so that we could live with freedom and fullness.

    2) A lot of people got hung up on the last part of my quote. What I said is that if hypothetically it came down to two singers with equal talent and a voter just couldn’t decide, human nature would probably set in and that voter would choose the person they relate to most (whether they be a Christian, a homosexual, from the same state as the contestant, etc). If we were honest, that’s kind of the sensationalism behind Idol isn’t it? We vote for someone not just because of their ability, but the whole package (how they come off as a person, what they do behind the scenes, their style, their story). HOWEVER, I HOPE Christians aren’t out there judging contestants on whether someone is a Christian or not. That’s ridiculous. Christians should vote on how talented someone is regardless of their beliefs. At its core, that’s what this contest is about.

    3) My main point when being interviewed was that I thought it was awesome that Christians seem to be moving away from “copying culture” and actually starting to help create it. For far too long we’ve heard Christian bands that sound like less talented versions of mainstream bands. We’ve made the word “Christian” a genre rather than a person. A few years ago, Christians would have foolishly boycotted a “secular” show like American Idol and probably would have just come up with a safe, alternate version shown only on “Christian television.” I think it’s a small step in the right direction when Christ followers step out of the church and enter a mainstream contest like American Idol, endeavoring to impress people with their talent rather than their beliefs.

    Feel free to reply here or go to my blog.